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dc.contributor.authorSitek, Kevin R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCai, Shanqingen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeal, Deryk S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPerkell, Joseph S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuenther, Frank H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Satrajit S.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialSwitzerlanden_US
dc.date2016-04-14
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-08T15:29:59Z
dc.date.available2018-02-08T15:29:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199712
dc.identifier.citationKevin R Sitek, Shanqing Cai, Deryk S Beal, Joseph S Perkell, Frank H Guenther, Satrajit S Ghosh. 2016. "Decreased Cerebellar-Orbitofrontal Connectivity Correlates with Stuttering Severity: Whole-Brain Functional and Structural Connectivity Associations with Persistent Developmental Stuttering.." Front Hum Neurosci, Volume 10:190.
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/26931
dc.description.abstractPersistent developmental stuttering is characterized by speech production disfluency and affects 1% of adults. The degree of impairment varies widely across individuals and the neural mechanisms underlying the disorder and this variability remain poorly understood. Here we elucidate compensatory mechanisms related to this variability in impairment using whole-brain functional and white matter connectivity analyses in persistent developmental stuttering. We found that people who stutter had stronger functional connectivity between cerebellum and thalamus than people with fluent speech, while stutterers with the least severe symptoms had greater functional connectivity between left cerebellum and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Additionally, people who stutter had decreased functional and white matter connectivity among the perisylvian auditory, motor, and speech planning regions compared to typical speakers, but greater functional connectivity between the right basal ganglia and bilateral temporal auditory regions. Structurally, disfluency ratings were negatively correlated with white matter connections to left perisylvian regions and to the brain stem. Overall, we found increased connectivity among subcortical and reward network structures in people who stutter compared to controls. These connections were negatively correlated with stuttering severity, suggesting the involvement of cerebellum and OFC may underlie successful compensatory mechanisms by more fluent stutterers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 DC007683 - NIDCD NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent190 - ?en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofFront Hum Neurosci
dc.rights© 2016 Sitek, Cai, Beal, Perkell, Guenther and Ghosh. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectPersistent developmental stutteringen_US
dc.subjectMRIen_US
dc.subjectResting stateen_US
dc.subjectDiffusionen_US
dc.subjectConnectivityen_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleDecreased cerebellar-orbitofrontal connectivity correlates with stuttering severity: whole-brain functional and structural connectivity associations with persistent developmental stutteringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2016.00190
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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© 2016 Sitek, Cai, Beal, Perkell, Guenther and Ghosh. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 Sitek, Cai, Beal, Perkell, Guenther and Ghosh. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.