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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTian, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTourville, J.A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYücel, M.A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKuczek, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBostian, A.J.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2017-05-15
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-20T21:08:47Z
dc.date.available2018-02-20T21:08:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-22
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28642548
dc.identifier.citationB Walsh, F Tian, JA Tourville, MA Yücel, T Kuczek, AJ Bostian. 2017. "Hemodynamics of speech production: An fNIRS investigation of children who stutter.." Sci Rep, Volume 7, Issue 1:4034.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27109
dc.description.abstractStuttering affects nearly 1% of the population worldwide and often has life-altering negative consequences, including poorer mental health and emotional well-being, and reduced educational and employment achievements. Over two decades of neuroimaging research reveals clear anatomical and physiological differences in the speech neural networks of adults who stutter. However, there have been few neurophysiological investigations of speech production in children who stutter. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), we examined hemodynamic responses over neural regions integral to fluent speech production including inferior frontal gyrus, premotor cortex, and superior temporal gyrus during a picture description task. Thirty-two children (16 stuttering and 16 controls) aged 7-11 years participated in the study. We found distinctly different speech-related hemodynamic responses in the group of children who stutter compared to the control group. Whereas controls showed significant activation over left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and left premotor cortex, children who stutter exhibited deactivation over these left hemisphere regions. This investigation of neural activation during natural, connected speech production in children who stutter demonstrates that in childhood stuttering, atypical functional organization for speech production is present and suggests promise for the use of fNIRS during natural speech production in future research with typical and atypical child populations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR03 DC013402 - NIDCD NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 4034en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.relation.isreplacedby2144/39059
dc.relation.isreplacedbyhttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39059
dc.rightsOpen Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectNear-infrared spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectTranscranial magnetic stimulationen_US
dc.subjectPositron emission tomographyen_US
dc.subjectSuperior temporal gyrusen_US
dc.subjectVoxel-based morphometryen_US
dc.subjectBroca's areaen_US
dc.subjectNeuroanatomical differencesen_US
dc.subjectLanguage productionen_US
dc.subjectSyllable productionen_US
dc.subjectMotor controlen_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.titleHemodynamics of speech production: An fNIRS investigation of children who stutteren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-04357-6
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.