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dc.contributor.authorSegawa, Jennifer A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTourville, Jason A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeal, Deryk S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuenther, Frank H.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-20T22:13:47Z
dc.date.available2018-02-20T22:13:47Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25313656
dc.identifier.citationJennifer A Segawa, Jason A Tourville, Deryk S Beal, Frank H Guenther. 2015. "The neural correlates of speech motor sequence learning.." J Cogn Neurosci, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp. 819 - 831.
dc.identifier.issn1530-8898
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27111
dc.description.abstractSpeech is perhaps the most sophisticated example of a species-wide movement capability in the animal kingdom, requiring split-second sequencing of approximately 100 muscles in the respiratory, laryngeal, and oral movement systems. Despite the unique role speech plays in human interaction and the debilitating impact of its disruption, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying speech motor learning. Here, we studied the behavioral and neural correlates of learning new speech motor sequences. Participants repeatedly produced novel, meaningless syllables comprising illegal consonant clusters (e.g., GVAZF) over 2 days of practice. Following practice, participants produced the sequences with fewer errors and shorter durations, indicative of motor learning. Using fMRI, we compared brain activity during production of the learned illegal sequences and novel illegal sequences. Greater activity was noted during production of novel sequences in brain regions linked to non-speech motor sequence learning, including the BG and pre-SMA. Activity during novel sequence production was also greater in brain regions associated with learning and maintaining speech motor programs, including lateral premotor cortex, frontal operculum, and posterior superior temporal cortex. Measures of learning success correlated positively with activity in left frontal operculum and white matter integrity under left posterior superior temporal sulcus. These findings indicate speech motor sequence learning relies not only on brain areas involved generally in motor sequencing learning but also those associated with feedback-based speech motor learning. Furthermore, learning success is modulated by the integrity of structural connectivity between these motor and sensory brain regions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 DC007683 - NIDCD NIH HHS; R01DC007683 - NIDCD NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent819 - 831en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofJ Cogn Neurosci
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, experimentalen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectAuditory feedbacken_US
dc.subjectEvent-related FMRIen_US
dc.subjectCortical surfaceen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental dyslexiaen_US
dc.subjectConsonant clustersen_US
dc.subjectAnterior insulaen_US
dc.subjectFrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectBasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic stimulationen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectBrainen_US
dc.subjectBrain mappingen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFunctional lateralityen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectImage processing, computer-assisteden_US
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMovementen_US
dc.subjectOxygenen_US
dc.subjectSerial learningen_US
dc.subjectSpeechen_US
dc.subjectTime factorsen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive scienceen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe neural correlates of speech motor sequence learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn_a_00737
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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