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dc.contributor.authorGeiser, Robert Leeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T19:27:48Z
dc.date.available2018-02-26T19:27:48Z
dc.date.issued1961
dc.date.submitted1961
dc.identifier.otherb14685498
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27207
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the efficiency of a limited number of conventional psychological test scores from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Rorschach in discriminating among three groups of patients who varied in level and kind of psychopathology. Previous studies have approached the problem from a univariate standpoint and have utilized conventional nosological categories as criterion groups. The present study differs from previous work in two ways: (1) It has utilized multivariate rather than univariate techniques of analysis and (2) It has systematically attempted to limit the degree of heterogeneity within the psychiatric criterion groups. Two psychiatric groups of twenty patients each were selected from out of a much larger nwnber of patients who were rated on the Wittenborn Psychiatric Rating Scales, which consists of nine factorially-determined scales. Each person's profile was matched with his own group and contrasted with members of the other group through the use of the D2 statistic. This enabled the homogeneity within a group and the heterogeneity between the groups to be controlled. The two groups differed primarily in the level of pathology (roughly Neurotic and Psychotic). A third group of twenty hospitalized medical and surgical patients served as controls [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.titleThe psychodiagnostic efficency of Wais and Rorschach scores: a discriminant function studyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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