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dc.contributor.authorTassinari, Annaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-28T19:57:43Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27344
dc.description.abstractLung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer death in the US, claiming over 160,000 lives annually. Although CT screening has been shown to be efficacious in reducing mortality, the limited access to screening programs among high-risk individuals and the high number of false positives contribute to low survival rates and increased healthcare costs. As a result, there is an urgent need for preventative therapeutics and novel interception biomarkers that would enhance current methods for detection of early-stage LC. This thesis addresses this challenge by examining the hypothesis that transcriptomic changes preceding the onset of LC can be identified by studying bronchial premalignant lesions (PMLs) and the normal-appearing airway epithelial cells altered in their presence (i.e., the PML-associated airway field of injury). PMLs are the presumed precursors of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) whose presence indicates an increased risk of developing SCC and other subtypes of LC. Here, I leverage high-throughput mRNA and miRNA sequencing data from bronchial brushings and lesion biopsies to develop biomarkers of PML presence and progression, and to understand regulatory mechanisms driving early carcinogenesis. First, I utilized mRNA sequencing data from normal-appearing airway brushings to build a biomarker predictive of PML presence. After verifying the power of the 200-gene biomarker to detect the presence of PMLs, I evaluated its capacity to predict PML progression and detect presence of LC (Aim 1). Next, I identified likely regulatory mechanisms associated with PML severity and progression, by evaluating miRNA expression and gene coexpression modules containing their targets in bronchial lesion biopsies (Aim2). Lastly, I investigated the preservation of the PML-associated miRNAs and gene modules in the airway field of injury, highlighting an emergent link between the airway field and the PMLs (Aim 3). Overall, this thesis suggests a multi-faceted utility of PML-associated genomic signatures as markers for stratification of high-risk smokers in chemoprevention trials, markers for early detection of lung cancer, and novel chemopreventive targets, and yields valuable insights into early lung carcinogenesis by characterizing mRNA and miRNA expression alterations that contribute to premalignant disease progression towards LC.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen_US
dc.subjectBiomarker discoveryen_US
dc.subjectLung canceren_US
dc.subjectNetwork analysisen_US
dc.subjectPremalignancyen_US
dc.titleMulti-omic biomarker discovery and network analyses to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of lung cancer premalignancyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-01-26T02:20:54Z
dc.description.embargo2020-01-25
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBioinformatics GRSen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International