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dc.contributor.authorYang, Yanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaatchi, Sassan S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Liangen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yifanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLefsky, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnyazikhin, Yurien_US
dc.contributor.authorMyneni, Ranga B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-12T15:25:39Z
dc.date.available2018-03-12T15:25:39Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000379985300053&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationYan Yang, Sassan S Saatchi, Liang Xu, Yifan Yu, Michael A Lefsky, Lee White, Yuri Knyazikhin, Ranga B Myneni. 2016. "Abiotic Controls on Macroscale Variations of Humid Tropical Forest Height." REMOTE SENSING, Volume 8, Issue 6:18.
dc.identifier.issn2072-4292
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27448
dc.description.abstractSpatial variation of tropical forest tree height is a key indicator of ecological processes associated with forest growth and carbon dynamics. Here we examine the macroscale variations of tree height of humid tropical forests across three continents and quantify the climate and edaphic controls on these variations. Forest tree heights are systematically sampled across global humid tropical forests with more than 2.5 million measurements from Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite observations (2004–2008). We used top canopy height (TCH) of GLAS footprints to grid the statistical mean and variance and the 90 percentile height of samples at 0.5 degrees to capture the regional variability of average and large trees globally. We used the spatial regression method (spatial eigenvector mapping-SEVM) to evaluate the contributions of climate, soil and topography in explaining and predicting the regional variations of forest height. Statistical models suggest that climate, soil, topography, and spatial contextual information together can explain more than 60% of the observed forest height variation, while climate and soil jointly explain 30% of the height variations. Soil basics, including physical compositions such as clay and sand contents, chemical properties such as PH values and cation-exchange capacity, as well as biological variables such as the depth of organic matter, all present independent but statistically significant relationships to forest height across three continents. We found significant relations between the precipitation and tree height with shorter trees on the average in areas of higher annual water stress, and large trees occurring in areas with low stress and higher annual precipitation but with significant differences across the continents. Our results confirm other landscape and regional studies by showing that soil fertility, topography and climate may jointly control a significant variation of forest height and influencing patterns of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Other factors such as biotic and disturbance regimes, not included in this study, may have less influence on regional variations but strongly mediate landscape and small-scale forest structure and dynamics.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was funded by Gabon National Park (ANPN) under the contract of 011-ANPN/2012/SE-LJTW at UCLA. We thank IIASA, FAO, USGS, NASA, Worldclim science teams for making their data available. (011-ANPN/2012/SE-LJTW - Gabon National Park (ANPN) at UCLA)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofREMOTE SENSING
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectRemote sensingen_US
dc.subjectTropical foresten_US
dc.subjectLIDARen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectSoilen_US
dc.subjectBiomassen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectAboveground biomassen_US
dc.subjectDrought sensitivityen_US
dc.subjectRainforesten_US
dc.subjectSRTM dataen_US
dc.subjectCarbonen_US
dc.subjectAmazon rainforesten_US
dc.titleAbiotic controls on macroscale variations of humid tropical forest heighten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/rs8060494
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0234-6393 (Myneni, Ranga B)


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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).