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dc.contributor.authorCoppock, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T15:46:33Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T15:46:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000365541100001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationElizabeth Coppock, David Beaver. 2015. "Definiteness and determinacy." Linguistics and Philosophy, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp. 377 - 435 (59).
dc.identifier.issn0165-0157
dc.identifier.issn1573-0549
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27520
dc.description.abstractThis paper distinguishes between definiteness and determinacy. Definiteness is seen as a morphological category which, in English, marks a (weak) uniqueness presupposition, while determinacy consists in denoting an individual. Definite descriptions are argued to be fundamentally predicative, presupposing uniqueness but not existence, and to acquire existential import through general type-shifting operations that apply not only to definites, but also indefinites and possessives. Through these shifts, argumental definite descriptions may become either determinate (and thus denote an individual) or indeterminate (functioning as an existential quantifier). The latter option is observed in examples like ‘Anna didn’t give the only invited talk at the conference’, which, on its indeterminate reading, implies that there is nothing in the extension of ‘only invited talk at the conference’. The paper also offers a resolution of the issue of whether possessives are inherently indefinite or definite, suggesting that, like indefinites, they do not mark definiteness lexically, but like definites, they typically yield determinate readings due to a general preference for the shifting operation that produces them.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Dag Haug, Reinhard Muskens, Luca Crnic, Cleo Condoravdi, Lucas Champollion, Stanley Peters, Roger Levy, Craige Roberts, Bert LeBruyn, Robin Cooper, Hans Kamp, Sebastian Lobner, Francois Recanati, Dan Giberman, Benjamin Schnieder, Rajka Smiljanic, Ede Zimmerman, as well as audiences at SALT 22 in Chicago, IATL 29 in Jerusalem, Going Heim in Connecticut, the Workshop on Bare Nominals and Non-Standard Definites in Utrecht, the University of Cambridge, the University of Gothenburg, the University of Konstanz, New York University, the University of Oxford, Rutgers University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, and the University of Texas at Austin. Beaver was supported by NSF grants BCS-0952862 and BCS-1452663. Coppock was supported by Swedish Research Council project 2009-1569 and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond's Pro Futura Scientia program, administered through the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study. (BCS-0952862 - NSF; BCS-1452663 - NSF; 2009-1569 - Swedish Research Council; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond's Pro Futura Scientia program)en_US
dc.format.extent377 - 435 (59)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLINGUISTICS AND PHILOSOPHY
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2015. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectLanguage & linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectDefinitenessen_US
dc.subjectDescriptionsen_US
dc.subjectPossessivesen_US
dc.subjectPredicatesen_US
dc.subjectType-shiftingen_US
dc.subjectSemanticsen_US
dc.subjectCognitive scienceen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
dc.titleDefiniteness and determinacyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10988-015-9178-8
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesOther: Accepted before BU appointment starteden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Romance Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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© The Author(s) 2015.
This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2015. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.