Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Geoffreyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T17:31:37Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T17:31:37Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/27527
dc.description.abstractMany teachers do not consider improvisation relevant to band or orchestra, and available research indicates that it is one of the least utilized activities in these classrooms. Bandura’s (1977, 1997) self-efficacy theory can explain many of the attitudes teachers have towards improvisation, as well as its absence in the classroom. I sought to discover what role self-efficacy played in leading some teachers to incorporate improvisation into their band and orchestra classrooms. Using a three-interview model as espoused by Seidman (1998), I interviewed six teachers about their experiences with improvisation in their teaching practice. I discovered five emergent themes that the participants had in common. These themes fit into two categories—the development of beliefs about improvisation, and how those beliefs about improvisation affected participants’ behavior. I conclude with a discussion of implications for the field and suggest that future research focus on the presence or lack of improvisation instruction during teacher education programs, as well as the prevalence and efficacy of professional development workshops around improvisation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMusic educationen_US
dc.subjectBanden_US
dc.subjectBanduraen_US
dc.subjectImprovisationen_US
dc.subjectOrchestraen_US
dc.subjectSelf efficacyen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.titleMusic teachers' experiences of improvisation in band and orchestra classroomsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-02-22T17:27:37Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Musical Artsen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMusic Educationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record