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dc.contributor.authorBoales, Joseph A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMateen, Farrukhen_US
dc.contributor.authorMohanty, Pritirajen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T17:52:20Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T17:52:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-28
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000408492000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationJoseph A Boales, Farrukh Mateen, Pritiraj Mohanty. 2017. "Optical wireless information transfer with nonlinear micromechanical resonators." Microsystems & Nanoengineering, Volume 3: 17026 (6).
dc.identifier.issn2055-7434
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/28270
dc.description.abstractWireless transfer of information is the basis of modern communication. It includes cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth, and GPS systems, all of which use electromagnetic radio waves with frequencies ranging from typically 100 MHz to a few GHz. However, several long-standing challenges with standard radio-wave wireless transmission still exist, including keeping secure transmission of data from potential compromise. Here, we demonstrate wireless information transfer using a line-of-sight optical architecture with a micromechanical element. In this fundamentally new approach, a laser beam encoded with information impinges on a nonlinear micromechanical resonator located a distance from the laser. The force generated by the radiation pressure of the laser light on the nonlinear micromechanical resonator produces a sideband modulation signal, which carries the precise information encoded in the subtle changes in the radiation pressure. Using this, we demonstrate data and image transfer with one hundred percent fidelity with a single 96-by-270 μm silicon resonator element in an optical frequency band. This mechanical approach relies only on the momentum of the incident photons and is therefore able to use any portion of the optical frequency band—a band that is 10 000 times wider than the radio frequency band. Our line-of-sight architecture using highly scalable micromechanical resonators offers new possibilities in wireless communication. Due to their small size, these resonators can be easily arrayed while maintaining a small form factor to provide redundancy and parallelism.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/micronano201726
dc.format.extentp. 17026en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrosystems & Nanoengineering
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectNanoscience & nanotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectInstruments & instrumentationen_US
dc.subjectMEMSen_US
dc.subjectPiezoelectricityen_US
dc.subjectRadiation pressureen_US
dc.subjectWireless communicationen_US
dc.subjectNanomechanical oscillatorsen_US
dc.subjectRadiation pressureen_US
dc.subjectMicromirroren_US
dc.titleOptical wireless information transfer with nonlinear micromechanical resonatorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/micronano.2017.26
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Physicsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/