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dc.contributor.authorBoales, Joseph A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMateen, Farrukhen_US
dc.contributor.authorMohanty, Pritirajen_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2017-11-06
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T18:05:25Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T18:05:25Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-22
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29167498
dc.identifier.citationJoseph A Boales, Farrukh Mateen, Pritiraj Mohanty. 2017. "Micromechanical Resonator Driven by Radiation Pressure Force.." Sci Rep, Volume 7, Issue 1: 16056.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/28271
dc.description.abstractRadiation pressure exerted by light on any surface is the pressure generated by the momentum of impinging photons. The associated force - fundamentally, a quantum mechanical aspect of light - is usually too small to be useful, except in large-scale problems in astronomy and astrodynamics. In atomic and molecular optics, radiation pressure can be used to trap or cool atoms and ions. Use of radiation pressure on larger objects such as micromechanical resonators has been so far limited to its coupling to an acoustic mode, sideband cooling, or levitation of microscopic objects. In this Letter, we demonstrate direct actuation of a radio-frequency micromechanical plate-type resonator by the radiation pressure force generated by a standard laser diode at room temperature. Using two independent methods, the magnitude of the resonator's response to forcing by radiation pressure is found to be proportional to the intensity of the incident light.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-16063-4.epdf
dc.format.extent16056en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectEarth satellite orbitsen_US
dc.subjectOptical levitationen_US
dc.subjectAtomsen_US
dc.subjectOscillatoren_US
dc.titleMicromechanical resonator driven by radiation pressure forceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-16063-4
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Physicsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or
format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative
Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this
article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the
material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted
by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the
copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.