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dc.contributor.authorKoh, H Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-09T15:39:38Z
dc.date.available2012-01-09T15:39:38Z
dc.date.issued1995-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationKoh, H K. "Preventive Strategies and Research for Ultraviolet-Associated Cancer." Environmental Health Perspectives 103(Suppl 8): 255-257. (1995)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2831
dc.description.abstractUltraviolet (UV)-associated cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Approximately 90% of nonmelanoma skin cancer and 65% of melanoma are attributable to UV exposure and theoretically could be eliminated by primary prevention measures. Safe sun strategy includes use of sunscreens, use of protective clothing, minimization of exposure from 10 A.M. to 3 P.M., and avoidance of tanning parlors. Although more definitive data in human populations on the effectiveness of sunscreens to prevent melanoma and skin cancer are needed, sunscreens are thought to reduce risk. Safe sun prevention must start in childhood and adolescence when people receive most of their UV exposure. Secondary prevention through professional and public education and early detection may further reduce melanoma mortality.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNational Institute of Environmental Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectMelanomaen_US
dc.subjectPara-aminobenzoic aciden_US
dc.subjectRadiationen_US
dc.subjectSkin canceren_US
dc.subjectSunscreenen_US
dc.subjectUltraviolet Aen_US
dc.subjectUltraviolet Ben_US
dc.titlePreventive Strategies and Research for Ultraviolet-Associated Canceren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmid8741794en_US
dc.identifier.pmcid1518958en_US


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