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dc.contributor.authorAnguah, Katherene O.-B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLovejoy, Jennifer C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Bruce A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGehrke, Malinda M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Philip A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEichelsdoerfer, Petra E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCrory, Megan A.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialSwitzerlanden_US
dc.date2017-02-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-01T15:28:18Z
dc.date.available2018-05-01T15:28:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-22
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28231094
dc.identifier.citationKatherene O-B Anguah, Jennifer C Lovejoy, Bruce A Craig, Malinda M Gehrke, Philip A Palmer, Petra E Eichelsdoerfer, Megan A McCrory. 2017. "Can the Palatability of Healthy, Satiety-Promoting Foods Increase with Repeated Exposure during Weight Loss?." Foods, Volume 6, Issue 2,
dc.identifier.issn2304-8158
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/28810
dc.description.abstractRepeated exposure to sugary, fatty, and salty foods often enhances their appeal. However, it is unknown if exposure influences learned palatability of foods typically promoted as part of a healthy diet. We tested whether the palatability of pulse containing foods provided during a weight loss intervention which were particularly high in fiber and low in energy density would increase with repeated exposure. At weeks 0, 3, and 6, participants (n = 42; body mass index (BMI) 31.2 ± 4.3 kg/m²) were given a test battery of 28 foods, approximately half which had been provided as part of the intervention, while the remaining half were not foods provided as part of the intervention. In addition, about half of each of the foods (provided as part or not provided as part of the intervention) contained pulses. Participants rated the taste, appearance, odor, and texture pleasantness of each food, and an overall flavor pleasantness score was calculated as the mean of these four scores. Linear mixed model analyses showed an exposure type by week interaction effect for taste, texture and overall flavor pleasantness indicating statistically significant increases in ratings of provided foods in taste and texture from weeks 0 to 3 and 0 to 6, and overall flavor from weeks 0 to 6. Repeated exposure to these foods, whether they contained pulses or not, resulted in a ~4% increase in pleasantness ratings. The long-term clinical relevance of this small increase requires further study.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipT32 AT000815 - NCCIH NIH HHSen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofFoods
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPalatabilityen_US
dc.subjectPulsesen_US
dc.subjectRepeated exposureen_US
dc.subjectWeight lossen_US
dc.titleCan the palatability of healthy, satiety-promoting foods increase with repeated exposure during weight loss?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/foods6020016
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Health Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US


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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).