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dc.contributor.advisorZiegler, Lawrence D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T18:21:54Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T18:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/28986
dc.description.abstractSurface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) has the potential to be a rapid disease diagnostic platform. SERS is a well-known ultrasensitive, label-free method for the detection and identification of molecules at low concentrations. The Raman cross-sections are primarily enhanced by plasmonic effects for molecules close to (< 5 nm) the surface of nanostructured metal substrates. Due to the unique Raman vibration features that provide molecular signatures, we have shown that SERS can provide a rapid (< one hour), label-free, sensitive and specific diagnosis for a number of diseases. This work demonstrates the capability of SERS to be an effective optical diagnostic approach, in particular, for bacterial infectious diseases such as urinary tract infections (UTI) and sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and cancer cell identification. More specifically, this work demonstrates the ability of SERS to distinguish different vegetative bacterial cells with species and strain specificity based on their intrinsic SERS molecular signatures. With the exception of C. trachomatis - the causative agent of chlamydia - whose SERS molecular signatures are found to be aggregated proteins on the cell membrane, all bacterial SERS molecular signatures are due to purine molecules resulting from nucleic acid metabolism as part of the rapid onset of the starvation response of these pathogens. The differences in relative contribution of different purine metabolites for each bacterium gives rise to the SERS strain and species specificity. The ability of SERS to distinguish cancer and normal cells grown in vitro based on changes of SERS spectral feature as a function of time after sample processing is also demonstrated. Furthermore, the difference of spectral features on the gold and silver SERS substrate of the same bacteria can be used as additional attribute for identification. This work demonstrate the potential of SERS platform to provide antibiotic-specific diagnostics in clinical settings within one hour when combined with a portable Raman microscopy instrument, an effective enrichment procedure, multivariate data analysis and an expendable SERS reference library with drug-susceptibility profile for each bacterial strain determined a priori, as well as the ability of SERS platform as a powerful bioanalytical probe for learning about near cell membrane biochemical processes.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectSERSen_US
dc.subjectSTDen_US
dc.subjectUTIen_US
dc.subjectBacterial diagnosticsen_US
dc.subjectCancer detectionen_US
dc.subjectSurface enhanced Raman spectroscopyen_US
dc.titleRapid, label-free disease diagnostics by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-04-23T01:00:26Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International