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dc.contributor.authorJia, Nanen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanko, Mikhailen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrincat, Scott L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSalazar-Gómez, Andrés F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuenther, Frank H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Earl K.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T18:13:55Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T18:13:55Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28098561
dc.identifier.citationNan Jia, Scott L Brincat, Andrés F Salazar-Gómez, Mikhail Panko, Frank H Guenther, Earl K Miller. 2017. "Decoding of intended saccade direction in an oculomotor brain-computer interface.." J Neural Eng, v. 14, no. 4
dc.identifier.issn1741-2552
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29006
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To date, invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) research has largely focused on replacing lost limb functions using signals from the hand/arm areas of motor cortex. However, the oculomotor system may be better suited to BCI applications involving rapid serial selection from spatial targets, such as choosing from a set of possible words displayed on a computer screen in an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) application. Here we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a BCI utilizing the oculomotor system. APPROACH: We developed a chronic intracortical BCI in monkeys to decode intended saccadic eye movement direction using activity from multiple frontal cortical areas. MAIN RESULTS: Intended saccade direction could be decoded in real time with high accuracy, particularly at contralateral locations. Accurate decoding was evident even at the beginning of the BCI session; no extensive BCI experience was necessary. High-frequency (80-500 Hz) local field potential magnitude provided the best performance, even over spiking activity, thus simplifying future BCI applications. Most of the information came from the frontal and supplementary eye fields, with relatively little contribution from dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the feasibility of high-accuracy intracortical oculomotor BCIs that require little or no practice to operate and may be ideally suited for 'point and click' computer operation as used in most current AAC systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 NS035145 - NINDS NIH HHS; R37 MH087027 - NIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Decoding+of+intended+saccade+direction+in+an+oculomotor+brain-computer+interface
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofJ Neural Eng
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectEngineering, biomedicalen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectBrain-computer interfaceen_US
dc.subjectEye movementsen_US
dc.subjectSaccadesen_US
dc.subjectDecodingen_US
dc.subjectLocal field potentialsen_US
dc.subjectFrontal eye fieldsen_US
dc.subjectNeuronal activityen_US
dc.subjectWorking memoryen_US
dc.subjectMachine interfaceen_US
dc.subjectMotor cortexen_US
dc.subjectMultiunit activityen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectCortical controlen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.titleDecoding of intended saccade direction in an oculomotor brain-computer interfaceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1741-2552/aa5a3e
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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