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dc.contributor.authorKim, Jong-Heeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraber, Ted G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrange, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLoon, Linda K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, LaDora V.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialNetherlandsen_US
dc.date2015-04-01
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-24T15:30:48Z
dc.date.available2018-05-24T15:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25893911
dc.identifier.citationTed G Graber, Jong-Hee Kim, Robert W Grange, Linda K McLoon, LaDora V Thompson. 2015. "C57BL/6 life span study: age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity.." Age (Dordr), v. 37, issue 3
dc.identifier.issn1574-4647
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29009
dc.description.abstractQuantification of key outcome measures in animal models of aging is an important step preceding intervention testing. One such measurement, skeletal muscle power generation (force * velocity), is critical for dynamic movement. Prior research focused on maximum power (P max), which occurs around 30-40 % of maximum load. However, movement occurs over the entire load range. Thus, the primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on power generation during concentric contractions in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles over the load range from 10 to 90 % of peak isometric tetanic force (P 0). Adult, old, and elderly male C57BL/6 mice were examined for contractile function (6-7 months old, 100 % survival; ~24 months, 75 %; and ~28 months, <50 %, respectively). Mice at other ages (5-32 months) were also tested for regression modeling. We hypothesized and found that power decreased with age not only at P max but also over the load range. Importantly, we found greater age-associated deficits in both power and velocity when the muscles were contracting concentrically against heavy loads (>50 % P 0). The shape of the force-velocity curve also changed with age (a/P 0 increased). In addition, there were prolonged contraction times to maximum force and shifts in the distribution of the myosin light and heavy chain isoforms in the EDL. The results demonstrate that age-associated difficulty in movement during challenging tasks is likely due, in addition to overall reduced force output, to an accelerated deterioration of power production and contractile velocity under heavily loaded conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 AG017768 - NIA NIH HHS; F31 AG044108 - NIA NIH HHS; T32 AG029796 - NIA NIH HHS; R01 EY15313 - NEI NIH HHS; R01 EY015313 - NEI NIH HHSen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofAge (Dordr)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiceen_US
dc.subjectSarcopeniaen_US
dc.subjectGerontologyen_US
dc.subjectIsometric contractionen_US
dc.subjectMice, inbred C57BLen_US
dc.subjectMuscle strengthen_US
dc.subjectMuscle, skeletalen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.titleC57BL/6 life span study: age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11357-015-9773-1
dc.rights.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Physical Therapy and Athletic Trainingen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International