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dc.contributor.authorGroeneveld, Richard A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-31T01:52:51Z
dc.date.available2018-05-31T01:52:51Z
dc.date.issued1963
dc.date.submitted1963
dc.identifier.otherb14564221
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29134
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractA complex modern society has presented its managers with the need to solve a variety of optimization problems. The desire to run a firm in such a way that profit is maximized, to schedule bombing runs to inflict a maximum of damage on an opponent consistent with acceptable losses, or to choose an assignment of available personnel which optimizes efficiency are typical examples. Such problems are called programming problems. The unifying idea here is that the limited resources (e.g. factors of production, planes, or personnel) which are available for use may be combined in a large (generally infinite) number of ways. The object is to choose from these possibilities the combination or combinations which will optimize a measure of the effectiveness of the enterprise. Mathematically, the programming problem is stated. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectComputer programmingen_US
dc.subjectMathematicsen_US
dc.titleMathematical methods of linear programmingen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMathematicsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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