Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHagopian, Elaine Catherineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-31T01:52:57Z
dc.date.available2018-05-31T01:52:57Z
dc.date.issued1962
dc.date.submitted1962
dc.identifier.otherb14677258
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29137
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study is twofold: (1) to bring into objective focus the actual problems many new nations of America now face--i.e. those attendant to the process of building rapidly modern unitary societies from previously segmented, illiterate and primarily tradition-oriented populations; and (2) to broaden and develop social science theory to deal with this relatively new phenomenon. Morocco is our case study. It is immediately recognized that in order for any society, in sociological terms, to exist as an on-going system, it must have a minimal degree of social integration. The concept of social integration has been developed and defined in the context of already established societies. It implies, of course; that a social structure exists and that part of that social structure is devoted to integrative functions [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectMoroccoen_US
dc.subjectNorth Africaen_US
dc.subjectSocial integrationen_US
dc.titleMorocco: A case study in the structural basis of social integrationen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record