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dc.contributor.authorHohler, Anna D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTsao, Jyeming M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Douglas I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDipiero, T. Joyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHehl, Christina L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Alissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Valerieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Mauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhenix, Heidien_US
dc.contributor.authorSaint-Hilaire, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Terryen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date2011-09-17
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T19:42:24Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T19:42:24Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22135763
dc.identifier.citationAnna D Hohler, Jyeming M Tsao, Douglas I Katz, T Joy Dipiero, Christina L Hehl, Alissa Leonard, Valerie Allen, Maura Gardner, Heidi Phenix, Marie Saint-Hilaire, Terry Ellis. 2012. "Effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism.." Parkinson's Disease, Volume 2012:871974.
dc.identifier.issn2042-0080
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29283
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigated the effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism, who typically respond poorly to pharmacologic intervention and are challenging to rehabilitate as outpatients. Ninety-one patients with atypical parkinsonism participated in an inpatient movement disorders program. Patients received physical, occupational, and speech therapy for 3 hours/day, 5 to 7 days/week, and pharmacologic adjustments based on daily observation and data. Differences between admission and discharge scores were analyzed for the functional independence measure (FIM), timed up and go test (TUG), two-minute walk test (TMW), Berg balance scale (BBS) and finger tapping test (FT), and all showed significant improvement on discharge (P > .001). Clinically significant improvements in total FIM score were evident in 74% of the patients. Results were similar for ten patients whose medications were not adjusted. Patients with atypical parkinsonism benefit from an inpatient interdisciplinary movement disorders program to improve functional status.en_US
dc.format.extent871974en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofParkinsons Dis
dc.rightsCopyright © 2012 Anna D. Hohler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectClinical neurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectProgressive supranuclear palsyen_US
dc.subjectMultiple system atrophyen_US
dc.subjectBerg Balance Scaleen_US
dc.subjectPhysical therapyen_US
dc.subjectCorticobasal degenerationen_US
dc.subjectClinical trialen_US
dc.subjectAtypical parkinsonismen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2012/871974
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Physical Therapy and Athletic Trainingen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Medicineen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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Copyright © 2012 Anna D. Hohler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2012 Anna D. Hohler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.