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dc.contributor.authorYamin, Rinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Chengen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Peter B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKee, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Carmela R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-09T20:58:40Z
dc.date.available2012-01-09T20:58:40Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.date.issued2009-7-23
dc.identifier.citationYamin, Rina, Cheng Zhao, Peter B O'Connor, Ann C McKee, Carmela R Abraham. "Acyl peptide hydrolase degrades monomeric and oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide" Molecular Neurodegeneration 4:33. (2009)
dc.identifier.issn1750-1326
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/2950
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide is believed to cause malfunctioning of neurons in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Amyloid-beta exists in different assembly forms in the aging mammalian brain including monomers, oligomers, and aggregates, and in senile plaques, fibrils. Recent findings suggest that soluble amyloid-beta oligomers may represent the primary pathological species in Alzheimer's disease and the most toxic form that impairs synaptic and thus neuronal function. We previously reported the isolation of a novel amyloid-beta-degrading enzyme, acyl peptide hydrolase, a serine protease that degrades amyloid-beta, and is different in structure and activity from other amyloid-beta-degrading enzymes. RESULTS Here we report the further characterization of acyl peptide hydrolase activity using mass spectrometry. Acyl peptide hydrolase cleaves the amyloid-beta peptide at amino acids 13, 14 and 19. In addition, by real-time PCR we found elevated acyl peptide hydrolase expression in brain areas rich in amyloid plaques suggesting that this enzyme's levels are responsive to increases in amyloid-beta levels. Lastly, tissue culture experiments using transfected CHO cells expressing APP751 bearing the V717F mutation indicate that acyl peptide hydrolase preferentially degrades dimeric and trimeric forms of amyloid-beta. CONCLUSION These data suggest that acyl peptide hydrolase is involved in the degradation of oligomeric amyloid-beta, an activity that, if induced, might present a new tool for therapy aimed at reducing neurodegeneration in the Alzheimer's brain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAlzheimer's Association (IIRG-02-3783); National Institute on Aging (P01-AG00001); BU ADC (NIA P30 AG13846); Department of Veterans' Affairs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2009 Yamin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.titleAcyl Peptide Hydrolase Degrades Monomeric and Oligomeric Amyloid-Beta Peptideen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1750-1326-4-33
dc.identifier.pmid19627603
dc.identifier.pmcid2726140


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Copyright 2009 Yamin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2009 Yamin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.