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dc.contributor.authorBowler, Arthur Wilsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-26T15:52:56Z
dc.date.available2018-06-26T15:52:56Z
dc.date.issued1952
dc.date.submitted1952
dc.identifier.otherb14763102
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29626
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston University. Page 7 misnumbered.en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom the year in which John Locke's volume, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding was published (1690), to the present time his theory of Innate Ideas has received both praise and criticism, some of which, in each case was justified and some unwarranted. It is the purpose of this thesis to defend Locke's theory of Innate Ideas against such extreme criticisms as "Locke's polemic is a straw man argument", "No man in his right mind ever claimed ideas to be innate in the sense which Locke attacks them", and "Locke destroyed innate intelligence with his polemic" [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsBased on investigation of the BU Libraries' staff, this work is free of known copyright restrictions.en_US
dc.subjectLocke, Johnen_US
dc.subjectInnate Ideasen_US
dc.titleLocke's critique of innate ideasen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025591613
dc.identifier.mmsid99175872230001161


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