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dc.contributor.authorChang, Charles B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T15:40:20Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T19:40:09Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T15:40:20Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T19:40:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000432233400006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationCharles B. Chang. 2018. "Perceptual attention as the locus of transfer to nonnative speech perception." Journal of Phonetics, Volume 68, pp. 85 - 102 (18). doi: 10.1016/j.wocn.2018.03.003
dc.identifier.issn0095-4470
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29808
dc.description.abstractOne’s native language (L1) is known to influence the development of a nonnative language (L2) at multiple levels, but the nature of L1 transfer to L2 perception remains unclear. This study explored the hypothesis that transfer effects in perception come from L1-specific processing strategies, which direct attention to phonetic cues according to their estimated relative functional load (RFL). Using target languages that were either familiar (English) or unfamiliar (Korean), perception of unreleased final stops was tested in L1 English listeners and four groups of L2 English learners whose L1s differ in stop phonotactics and the estimated RFL of a crucial cue to unreleased stops (i.e., vowel-to-consonant formant transitions). Results were, overall, consistent with the hypothesis, with L1 Japanese listeners showing the poorest perception, followed by L1 Mandarin, Russian, English, and Korean listeners. Two exceptions occurred with Russian listeners, who underperformed Mandarin listeners in identification of English stops and outperformed English listeners in identification of Korean stops. Taken together, these findings support a cue-centric view of transfer based on perceptual attention over a direct phonotactic view based on structural conformity. However, transfer interacts with prior L2 knowledge, which may result in significantly different perceptual consequences for a familiar and an unfamiliar L2.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe author gratefully acknowledges funding from the Center for Advanced Study of Language and logistical assistance from the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences and Second Language Acquisition Program at the University of Maryland and from the Department of Linguistics at New York University. The paper benefited from the feedback of Taehong Cho, Karthik Durvasula, and several anonymous reviewers, as well as discussions with Nick Fleisher, Slava Gorbachov, Kevin Roon, Geoff Schwartz, and audiences at the CUNY Graduate Center, the University of Cambridge, University College London, MIT, the 7th International Symposium on the Acquisition of Second Language Speech, and the 167th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (Chang, 2014). (Center for Advanced Study of Language; Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at New York University; Second Language Acquisition Program at the University of Maryland; Department of Linguistics at New York University)en_US
dc.format.extentp. 85 - 102en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Phonetics
dc.relation.replaceshttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/28903
dc.relation.replaces2144/28903
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectLanguage & linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectSelective perception routineen_US
dc.subjectLanguage transferen_US
dc.subjectUnreleased stopsen_US
dc.subjectCue weightingen_US
dc.subjectInformation valueen_US
dc.subjectFunctional loaden_US
dc.subjectCoarticulationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican English approximantsen_US
dc.subjectPhonological influencesen_US
dc.subjectListeners perceptionen_US
dc.subjectLanguage experienceen_US
dc.subjectJapaneseen_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
dc.subjectConsonantsen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, communication and cultureen_US
dc.subjectSpeech-language pathology & audiologyen_US
dc.titlePerceptual attention as the locus of transfer to nonnative speech perceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wocn.2018.03.003
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Romance Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3537-2053 (Chang, Charles B)


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