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dc.contributor.advisorSagar, Manishen_US
dc.contributor.authorRegistre, Ludyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-17T17:44:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/29958
dc.description.abstractHIV-1 primarily utilizes the CCR5 receptor as a co-receptor, but over time, viruses can evolve to use the CXCR4 protein. Changes in the viral envelope V3 loop mediate this switch. The emergence of CXCR4-utilizing viruses has been presumed to occur as a consequence of decreased humoral immunity. We show that exclusively CXCR4-using (X4) viruses contain a 2 to 3 amino acid insertion in the V3 loop. Structural modeling revealed that this insertion caused a protrusion in the V3 loop, which impacts CCR5 receptor interaction. These genotypic and structural motifs affected neutralization susceptibility because X4, as compared to co-circulating CCR5-utilizing (R5) viruses, were less neutralization sensitive to autologous contemporaneous and heterologous plasma. Individuals with co-circulating X4 and R5, as compared to those with only R5, viruses had similar neutralization breadth and potency indicating that the emergence of X4 viruses is not associated with decreased humoral immunity. These results suggest that X4 viruses are neutralization escape variants and arise due to humoral selective pressure. This work has implications for future antibody-based therapeutics. Along with providing a framework for developing an HIV-1 vaccine, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are also being investigated as a potential therapeutic. BnAbs target a limited number of conserved HIV-1 envelope structures, including glycans in and around the V1/V2 and V3 domains. Along with the V3 loop, changes in V1/V2 are also known to impact co-receptor usage. We show that viruses that exclusively use the CXCR4 co-receptor, as compared to variants that only utilize CCR5, were less neutralization sensitive to V1/V2 and V3 directed bnAbs. In contrast, R5 and X4 viruses did not demonstrate neutralization differences to bnAbs that target non-V1/V2 and V3 envelope regions, such as the CD4 binding site and the membrane proximal external region. Structural modeling revealed that the predicted orientation of the V1/V2 loop among diverse HIV-1 variants predicts susceptibility to V3 loop directed bnAbs. In aggregate, our results suggest that viruses with different co-receptor usage have differing bnAb susceptibility. Furthermore, structural modeling may be used as a tool to predict neutralization susceptibility to bnAbs against regions associated with co-receptor usage.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectCCR5en_US
dc.subjectCXCR4en_US
dc.subjectHIVen_US
dc.subjectBroadly neutralizing antibodies CCR5en_US
dc.subjectCo-receptoren_US
dc.subjectNeutralizationen_US
dc.titleExamination of the role of envelope directed antibodies on co-receptor usage in HIV-1B infectionen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-06-12T22:13:04Z
dc.description.embargo2020-06-12T00:00:00Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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