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dc.contributor.authorFregosi, Ralph F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuan, Stuart F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Andrew C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaemingk, Kris L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Wayne J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, Jamie L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReeder, Jenny C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCabrera, Rosaria K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAntonio, Elenaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T00:37:40Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T00:37:40Z
dc.date.copyright2004
dc.date.issued2004-4-29
dc.identifier.citationFregosi, Ralph F, Stuart F Quan, Andrew C Jackson, Kris L Kaemingk, Wayne J Morgan, Jamie L Goodwin, Jenny C Reeder, Rosaria K Cabrera, Elena Antonio. "Ventilatory drive and the apnea-hypopnea index in six-to-twelve year old children" BMC Pulmonary Medicine 4:4. (2004)
dc.identifier.issn1471-2466
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3006
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. We tested the hypothesis that ventilatory drive in hypoxia and hypercapnia is inversely correlated with the number of hypopneas and obstructive apneas per hour of sleep (obstructive apnea hypopnea index, OAHI) in children. METHODS. Fifty children, 6 to 12 years of age were studied. Participants had an in-home unattended polysomnogram to compute the OAHI. We subsequently estimated ventilatory drive in normoxia, at two levels of isocapnic hypoxia, and at three levels of hyperoxic hypercapnia in each subject. Experiments were done during wakefulness, and the mouth occlusion pressure measured 0.1 seconds after inspiratory onset (P0.1) was measured in all conditions. The slope of the relation between P0.1 and the partial pressure of end-tidal O2 or CO2 (PETO2 and PETCO2) served as the index of hypoxic or hypercapnic ventilatory drive. RESULTS. Hypoxic ventilatory drive correlated inversely with OAHI (r = -0.31, P = 0.041), but the hypercapnic ventilatory drive did not (r = -0.19, P = 0.27). We also found that the resting PETCO2 was significantly and positively correlated with the OAHI, suggesting that high OAHI values were associated with resting CO2 retention. CONCLUSIONS. In awake children the OAHI correlates inversely with the hypoxic ventilatory drive and positively with the resting PETCO2. Whether or not diminished hypoxic drive or resting CO2 retention while awake can explain the severity of sleep-disordered breathing in this population is uncertain, but a reduced hypoxic ventilatory drive and resting CO2 retention are associated with sleep-disordered breathing in 6–12 year old children.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGrants (HL 62373, HL 51056)en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2004 Fregosi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL.en_US
dc.subjectControl of breathingen_US
dc.subjectHypoxiaen_US
dc.subjectApnea-hypopnea indexen_US
dc.subjectHypercapniaen_US
dc.subjectMouth occlusion pressureen_US
dc.titleVentilatory Drive and the Apnea-Hypopnea Index in Six-to-Twelve Year Old Childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2466-4-4
dc.identifier.pmid15117413
dc.identifier.pmcid419706


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