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dc.contributor.authorKramer, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoopun, Anita K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarracedo, Lucy M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTraub, Roger D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhittington, Miles A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKopell, Nancy J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T19:18:28Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T19:18:28Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationKramer MA, Roopun AK, Carracedo LM, Traub RD, Whittington MA, Kopell NJ (2008) Rhythm Generation through Period Concatenation in Rat Somatosensory Cortex. PLoS Comput Biol 4(9): e1000169. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000169
dc.identifier.issn1553-7358
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/30825
dc.description.abstractRhythmic voltage oscillations resulting from the summed activity of neuronal populations occur in many nervous systems. Contemporary observations suggest that coexistent oscillations interact and, in time, may switch in dominance. We recently reported an example of these interactions recorded from in vitro preparations of rat somatosensory cortex. We found that following an initial interval of coexistent gamma (∼25 ms period) and beta2 (∼40 ms period) rhythms in the superficial and deep cortical layers, respectively, a transition to a synchronous beta1 (∼65 ms period) rhythm in all cortical layers occurred. We proposed that the switch to beta1 activity resulted from the novel mechanism of period concatenation of the faster rhythms: gamma period (25 ms)+beta2 period (40 ms) = beta1 period (65 ms). In this article, we investigate in greater detail the fundamental mechanisms of the beta1 rhythm. To do so we describe additional in vitro experiments that constrain a biologically realistic, yet simplified, computational model of the activity. We use the model to suggest that the dynamic building blocks (or motifs) of the gamma and beta2 rhythms combine to produce a beta1 oscillation that exhibits cross-frequency interactions. Through the combined approach of in vitro experiments and mathematical modeling we isolate the specific components that promote or destroy each rhythm. We propose that mechanisms vital to establishing the beta1 oscillation include strengthened connections between a population of deep layer intrinsically bursting cells and a transition from antidromic to orthodromic spike generation in these cells. We conclude that neural activity in the superficial and deep cortical layers may temporally combine to generate a slower oscillation.en_US
dc.format.extente1000169en_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Comput Biol
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2008 Kramer et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectBiochemical research methodsen_US
dc.subjectMathematical & computational biologyen_US
dc.subjectBiochemistry & molecular biologyen_US
dc.subjectHuman electroencephalogramen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectComputational biologyen_US
dc.subjectElectrophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectExcitatory amino acid agonistsen_US
dc.subjectIn vitro techniquesen_US
dc.subjectKainic aciden_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectModels, neurologicalen_US
dc.subjectModels, statisticalen_US
dc.subjectPeriodicityen_US
dc.subjectRatsen_US
dc.subjectRats, Wistaren_US
dc.subjectReceptors, N-methyl-D-aspartateen_US
dc.subjectSomatosensory cortexen_US
dc.subjectTime factorsen_US
dc.subjectSomatosensory cortexen_US
dc.subjectTime factorsen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.subjectInformation and computing aciencesen_US
dc.subjectMathematical aciencesen_US
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen_US
dc.titleRhythm generation through period concatenation in rat somatosensory cortexen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics & Statisticsen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8568-8750 (Kopell, NJ)


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Copyright: © 2008 Kramer et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2008 Kramer et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.