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dc.contributor.authorBörgers, Christophen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKopell, Nancyen_US
dc.coverage.spatialGermanyen_US
dc.date2014-03-28
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T19:29:01Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T19:29:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27334376
dc.identifier.citationChristoph Börgers, Jie Li, Nancy Kopell. 2014. "Approximate, not Perfect Synchrony Maximizes the Downstream Effectiveness of Excitatory Neuronal Ensembles.." The Journal of Mathematical Neuroscience 2014 4:10. https://doi.org/10.1186/2190-8567-4-10
dc.identifier.issn2190-8567
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/30826
dc.description.abstractThe most basic functional role commonly ascribed to synchrony in the brain is that of amplifying excitatory neuronal signals. The reasoning is straightforward: When positive charge is injected into a leaky target neuron over a time window of positive duration, some of it will have time to leak back out before an action potential is triggered in the target, and it will in that sense be wasted. If the goal is to elicit a firing response in the target using as little charge as possible, it seems best to deliver the charge all at once, i.e., in perfect synchrony. In this article, we show that this reasoning is correct only if one assumes that the input ceases when the target crosses the firing threshold, but before it actually fires. If the input ceases later-for instance, in response to a feedback signal triggered by the firing of the target-the "most economical" way of delivering input (the way that requires the least total amount of input) is no longer precisely synchronous, but merely approximately so. If the target is a heterogeneous network, as it always is in the brain, then ceasing the input "when the target crosses the firing threshold" is not an option, because there is no single moment when the firing threshold is crossed. In this sense, precise synchrony is never optimal in the brain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR01 NS067199 - NINDS NIH HHSen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofJ Math Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1186/2190-8567-4-10
dc.rights© 2014 C. Börgers et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.subjectCoincidence detectionen_US
dc.subjectFunction of synchronyen_US
dc.subjectLeakinessen_US
dc.titleApproximate, not perfect synchrony maximizes the downstream effectiveness of excitatory neuronal ensemblesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics & Statisticsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8568-8750 (Kopell, Nancy)


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© 2014 C. Börgers et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of
the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly
cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 C. Börgers et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.