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dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Ryan P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeddy, Abigail L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCavanaugh, James T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDibble, Leland E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Terry D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFord, Matthew P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorForeman, K. Boen_US
dc.contributor.authorEarhart, Gammon M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T14:39:45Z
dc.date.available2018-08-22T14:39:45Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000363350300017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationRyan P Duncan, Abigail L Leddy, James T Cavanaugh, Leland E Dibble, Terry D Ellis, Matthew P Ford, K Bo Foreman, Gammon M Earhart. 2015. "Balance differences in people with Parkinson disease with and without freezing of gait." Gait & Posture, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp. 306 - 309 (4). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.06.007
dc.identifier.issn0966-6362
dc.identifier.issn1879-2219
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/30883
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: Gait Posture. 2015 September ; 42(3): 306–309. doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.06.007.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Freezing of gait (FOG) is a relatively common and remarkably disabling impairment associated with Parkinson disease (PD). Laboratory-based measures indicate that individuals with FOG (PD+FOG) have greater balance deficits than those without FOG (PD-FOG). Whether such differences also can be detected using clinical balance tests has not been investigated. We sought to determine if balance and specific aspects of balance, measured using Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), differs between PD+FOG and PD-FOG. Furthermore, we aimed to determine if time-efficient clinical balance measures (i.e. Mini-BESTest, Berg Balance Scale (BBS)) could detect balance differences between PD+FOG and PD-FOG. METHODS: Balance of 78 individuals with PD, grouped as either PD+FOG (n=32) or PD-FOG (n=46), was measured using the BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and BBS. Between-groups comparisons were conducted for these measures and for the six sections of the BESTest using analysis of covariance. A PD composite score was used as a covariate. RESULTS: Controlling for motor sign severity, PD duration, and age, PD+FOG had worse balance than PD-FOG when measured using the BESTest (p=0.008, F=7.35) and Mini-BESTest (p=0.002, F=10.37), but not the BBS (p=0.27, F=1.26). BESTest section differences were noted between PD+FOG and PD-FOG for reactive postural responses (p<0.001, F=14.42) and stability in gait (p=0.003, F=9.18). CONCLUSIONS: The BESTest and Mini-BESTest, which specifically assessed reactive postural responses and stability in gait, were more likely than the BBS to detect differences in balance between PD+FOG and PD-FOG. Because it is more time efficient to administer, the Mini-BESTest may be the preferred tool for assessing balance deficits associated with FOG.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was conducted with funding from the Davis Phinney Foundation, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, NIH R01 NS077959, NIH UL1 TR000448, Greater St. Louis American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA), APDA Center for Advanced PD Research at Washington University in St. Louis. The funding sources had no role in the study design, in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript; or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. (Davis Phinney Foundation; Parkinson's Disease Foundation; R01 NS077959 - NIH; UL1 TR000448 - NIH; Greater St. Louis American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA); APDA Center for Advanced PD Research at Washington University in St. Louis)en_US
dc.format.extent306 - 309 (4)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER IRELAND LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGAIT & POSTURE
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.06.007
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectOrthopedicsen_US
dc.subjectSport sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectParkinson diseaseen_US
dc.subjectFreezing of gaiten_US
dc.subjectBalanceen_US
dc.subjectBESTesten_US
dc.subjectMini-BESTesten_US
dc.subjectFallsen_US
dc.subjectMini-BESTesten_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen_US
dc.subjectCross-sectional studiesen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGaiten_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectPostural balanceen_US
dc.subjectReproducibility of resultsen_US
dc.subjectClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectHuman movement and sports scienceen_US
dc.subjectMechanical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectOrthopedicsen_US
dc.titleBalance differences in people with Parkinson disease with and without freezing of gaiten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Physical Therapy and Athletic Trainingen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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