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dc.contributor.authorKesseli, Aurora Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMuirhead, Philip S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMann, Andrew W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMace, Gregen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-29T14:01:07Z
dc.date.available2018-08-29T14:01:07Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000431526900001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationAurora Y Kesseli, Philip S Muirhead, Andrew W Mann, Greg Mace. 2018. "Magnetic Inflation and Stellar Mass. II. On the Radii of Single, Rapidly Rotating, Fully Convective M-Dwarf Stars." ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL, Volume 155, Issue 6. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/aabccb
dc.identifier.issn0004-6256
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/30931
dc.description.abstractMain-sequence, fully convective M dwarfs in eclipsing binaries are observed to be larger than stellar evolutionary models predict by as much as 10%–15%. A proposed explanation for this discrepancy involves effects from strong magnetic fields, induced by rapid rotation via the dynamo process. Although, a handful of single, slowly rotating M dwarfs with radius measurements from interferometry also appear to be larger than models predict, suggesting that rotation or binarity specifically may not be the sole cause of the discrepancy. We test whether single, rapidly rotating, fully convective stars are also larger than expected by measuring their $R\sin i$ distribution. We combine photometric rotation periods from the literature with rotational broadening ($v\sin i$) measurements reported in this work for a sample of 88 rapidly rotating M dwarf stars. Using a Bayesian framework, we find that stellar evolutionary models underestimate the radii by $10 \% \mbox{--}15{ \% }_{-2.5}^{+3}$, but that at higher masses (0.18 < M < 0.4 M Sun), the discrepancy is only about 6% and comparable to results from interferometry and eclipsing binaries. At the lowest masses (0.08 < M < 0.18 M Sun), we find that the discrepancy between observations and theory is 13%–18%, and we argue that the discrepancy is unlikely to be due to effects from age. Furthermore, we find no statistically significant radius discrepancy between our sample and the handful of M dwarfs with interferometric radii. We conclude that neither rotation nor binarity are responsible for the inflated radii of fully convective M dwarfs, and that all fully convective M dwarfs are larger than models predict.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank the referee for the thoughtful report, which greatly improved the manuscript. The authors would also like to thank Lisa Prato and Larissa Nofi for IGRINS training, and Heidi Larson, Jason Sanborn, and Andrew Hayslip for operating the DCT during our observations. We would also like to thank Jen Winters, Jonathan Irwin, Paul Dalba, Mark Veyette, Eunkyu Han, and Andrew Vanderburg for useful discussions and helpful comments on this work. Some of this work was supported by the NASA Exoplanet Research Program (XRP) under grant No. NNX15AG08G issued through the Science Mission Directorate.These results made use of the Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope, supported by Discovery Communications, Inc., Boston University, the University of Maryland, the University of Toledo and Northern Arizona University; the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) that was developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation under grant AST-1229522, of the University of Texas at Austin, and of the Korean GMT Project of KASI; data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin; and data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by NASA and the NSF. (NNX15AG08G - NASA Exoplanet Research Program (XRP); Discovery Communications, Inc.; Boston University; University of Maryland; University of Toledo; Northern Arizona University; AST-1229522 - US National Science Foundation; University of Texas at Austin; Korean GMT Project of KASI; NASA; NSF)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/aabccb
dc.rights© 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectAstronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.subjectStars: fundamental parametersen_US
dc.subjectStars: low-massen_US
dc.subjectStars: magnetic fielden_US
dc.subjectStars: rotationen_US
dc.subjectStars: statisticsen_US
dc.subjectProxima Centaurien_US
dc.subjectCool starsen_US
dc.subjectLuminosityen_US
dc.subjectPleiadesen_US
dc.subjectAstronomical and space sciencesen_US
dc.titleMagnetic inflation and Stellar Mass. II. On the radii of wingle, rapidly rotating, fully convective M-dwarf starsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Astronomyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0638-8822 (Muirhead, Philip S)


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