Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSalazar, Robert D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRen, Xiaolinen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Terry D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorToraif, Nooren_US
dc.contributor.authorBarthelemy, Olivier J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNeargarder, Sandyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T15:41:03Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T15:41:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationRD Salazar, X Ren, TD Ellis, N Toraif, OJ Barthelemy, S Neargarder, A Cronin-Golomb. 2017. "Dual Tasking in Parkinson's Disease: Cognitive Consequences While Walking.." Neuropsychology, 2017 September ; 31(6): 613–623. https://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000331.
dc.identifier.issn1931-1559
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31168
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: Neuropsychology. 2017 September; 31(6): 613–623. doi:10.1037/neu0000331.en_US
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Cognitive deficits are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and exacerbate the functional limitations imposed by PD's hallmark motor symptoms, including impairments in walking. Though much research has addressed the effect of dual cognitive-locomotor tasks on walking, less is known about their effect on cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between gait and executive function, with the hypothesis that dual tasking would exacerbate cognitive vulnerabilities in PD as well as being associated with gait disturbances. METHOD: Nineteen individuals with mild-moderate PD without dementia and 13 age- and education-matched normal control adults (NC) participated. Executive function (set-shifting) and walking were assessed singly and during dual tasking. RESULTS: Dual tasking had a significant effect on cognition (reduced set-shifting) and on walking (speed, stride length) for both PD and NC, and also on stride frequency for PD only. The impact of dual tasking on walking speed and stride frequency was significantly greater for PD than NC. Though the group by condition interaction was not significant, PD had fewer set-shifts than NC on dual task. Further, relative to NC, PD showed significantly greater variability in cognitive performance under dual tasking, whereas variability in motor performance remained unaffected by dual tasking. CONCLUSIONS: Dual tasking had a significantly greater effect in PD than in NC on cognition as well as on walking. The results suggest that assessment and treatment of PD should consider the cognitive as well as the gait components of PD-related deficits under dual-task conditions. (PsycINFO Database Record).en_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuropsychology
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000331
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectDual taskingen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_US
dc.subjectGait dysfunctionen_US
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trialen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectDefault mode networken_US
dc.subjectBasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectBilateral coordinationen_US
dc.subjectGait variabilityen_US
dc.subjectMotor tasksen_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectCognitive dysfunctionen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGait disorders, Neurologicen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectWalkingen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleDual tasking in Parkinson's disease: cognitive consequences while walkingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Physical Therapy and Athletic Trainingen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record