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dc.contributor.authorWillis, Charles G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRuhfel, Brad R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPrimack, Richard B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller-Rushing, Abraham J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLosos, Jonathan B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Charles C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T16:55:01Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T16:55:01Z
dc.date.issued2010-1-26
dc.identifier.citationWillis, Charles G., Brad R. Ruhfel, Richard B. Primack, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Jonathan B. Losos, Charles C. Davis. "Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods" PLoS ONE 5(1): e8878. (2010)
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3138
dc.description.abstractInvasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes than native species. Recent evidence indicates that species that respond to climate change by adjusting their phenology (i.e., the timing of seasonal activities, such as flowering) have historically increased in abundance. The extent to which non-native species success is similarly linked to a favorable climate change response, however, remains untested. We analyzed a dataset initiated by the conservationist Henry David Thoreau that documents the long-term phenological response of native and non-native plant species over the last 150 years from Concord, Massachusetts (USA). Our results demonstrate that non-native species, and invasive species in particular, have been far better able to respond to recent climate change by adjusting their flowering time. This demonstrates that climate change has likely played, and may continue to play, an important role in facilitating non-native species naturalization and invasion at the community level.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (EF 04-31242); Division of Environmental Biology (0413458/0842749)en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.rightsWillis et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.titleFavorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0008878
dc.identifier.pmid20126652
dc.identifier.pmcid2811191


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