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dc.contributor.authorGoldmann, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAiello, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorUddin, Monicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDelva, Jorgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoenen, Karestanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalea, Sandroen_US
dc.contributor.authorGant, Larry M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T19:05:46Z
dc.date.available2018-09-28T19:05:46Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000298581800016&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationEmily Goldmann, Allison Aiello, Monica Uddin, Jorge Delva, Karestan Koenen, Larry M Gant, Sandro Galea. 2011. "Pervasive exposure to violence and posttraumatic stress disorder in a predominantly African American Urban Community: The Detroit neighborhood health study." JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp. 747 - 751 (5). https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20705
dc.identifier.issn0894-9867
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31440
dc.description.abstractExposure to traumatic events is common, particularly among economically disadvantaged, urban African Americans. There is, however, scant data on the psychological consequences of exposure to traumatic events in this group. We assessed experience with traumatic events and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 1,306 randomly selected, African American residents of Detroit. Lifetime prevalence of exposure to at least 1 traumatic event was 87.2% (assault = 51.0%). African Americans from Detroit have a relatively high burden of PTSD; 17.1% of those who experienced a traumatic event met criteria for probable lifetime PTSD. Assaultive violence is pervasive and is more likely to be associated with subsequent PTSD than other types of events. Further efforts to prevent violence and increase access to mental health treatment could reduce the mental health burden in economically disadvantaged urban areas.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipK08 MH070627 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH078928 - NIMH NIH HHS; R01 DA022720 - NIDA NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 747-751en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20705
dc.subjectPsychiatryen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, clinicalen_US
dc.subjectTraumatic eventsen_US
dc.subjectPopulationen_US
dc.subjectImpacten_US
dc.titlePervasive exposure to violence and posttraumatic stress disorder in a predominantly African American urban community: the Detroit neighborhood health studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jts.20705
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: 24 monthsen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Public Healthen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Social Worken_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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