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dc.contributor.authorColon-Semenza, Cristinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLatham, Nancy K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuintiliani, Lisa M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Terry D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-18T15:31:15Z
dc.date.available2018-10-18T15:31:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000426415800009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationCristina Colon-Semenza, Nancy K Latham, Lisa M Quintiliani, Terry D Ellis. 2018. "Peer Coaching Through mHealth Targeting Physical Activity in People With Parkinson Disease: Feasibility Study." JMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp. ? - ? (13). https://doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.8074
dc.identifier.issn2291-5222
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31478
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Long-term engagement in exercise and physical activity mitigates the progression of disability and increases quality of life in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Despite this, the vast majority of individuals with PD are sedentary. There is a critical need for a feasible, safe, acceptable, and effective method to assist those with PD to engage in active lifestyles. Peer coaching through mobile health (mHealth) may be a viable approach. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a PD-specific peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth technology with the goal of increasing physical activity in persons with PD. We set out to examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of the programs along with preliminary evidence of individual-level changes in walking activity, self-efficacy, and disability in the peer mentees. METHODS: A peer coach training program and a remote peer-mentored walking program using mHealth was developed and tested in 10 individuals with PD. We matched physically active persons with PD (peer coaches) with sedentary persons with PD (peer mentees), resulting in 5 dyads. Using both Web-based and in-person delivery methods, we trained the peer coaches in basic knowledge of PD, exercise, active listening, and motivational interviewing. Peer coaches and mentees wore FitBit Zip activity trackers and participated in daily walking over 8 weeks. Peer dyads interacted daily via the FitBit friends mobile app and weekly via telephone calls. Feasibility was determined by examining recruitment, participation, and retention rates. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events during the study period. Acceptability was assessed via satisfaction surveys. Individual-level changes in physical activity were examined relative to clinically important differences. RESULTS: Four out of the 5 peer pairs used the FitBit activity tracker and friends function without difficulty. A total of 4 of the 5 pairs completed the 8 weekly phone conversations. There were no adverse events over the course of the study. All peer coaches were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the training program, and all participants were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the peer-mentored walking program. All participants would recommend this program to others with PD. Increases in average steps per day exceeding the clinically important difference occurred in 4 out of the 5 mentees. CONCLUSIONS: Remote peer coaching using mHealth is feasible, safe, and acceptable for persons with PD. Peer coaching using mHealth technology may be a viable method to increase physical activity in individuals with PD. Larger controlled trials are necessary to examine the effectiveness of this approach.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study is supported by Boston Roybal Center for Active Lifestyle Interventions (RALI Boston), Grant #P30 AG048785, and the American Parkinson Disease Association, Massachusetts chapter. The authors would like to thank Nicole Sullivan, SOT, for her assistance with data management and data collection and Nick Wendel, DPT, for his assistance with data collection. Additionally, the authors would like to thank the participants in this study for their time, effort, and insights. (P30 AG048785 - Boston Roybal Center for Active Lifestyle Interventions (RALI Boston); American Parkinson Disease Association, Massachusetts chapter)en_US
dc.format.extent13 p.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherJMIR PUBLICATIONS, INCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.8074
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR mhealth and uhealth, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mhealth.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectParkinson diseaseen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectHealth care sciences & servicesen_US
dc.subjectMedical informaticsen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectSocial supporten_US
dc.subjectFitness trackeren_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_US
dc.subjectAmbulatory activityen_US
dc.subjectRandomized trialen_US
dc.subjectHealthen_US
dc.subjectInterventionsen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectPromotionen_US
dc.titlePeer coaching through mHealth targeting physical activity in people with Parkinson disease: feasibility studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/mhealth.8074
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent Collegeen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Physical Therapy and Athletic Trainingen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Medicineen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International