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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Brianaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T12:44:55Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherb38906752
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31516
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractA combination of overexploitation and destructive fishing practices, such as bottom trawling, have depleted native populations of groundfishes in coastal New England and reduced benthic community diversity. The Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) in the southern Gulf of Maine is partially overlapped by the Western Gulf of Maine Closed Area (WGMCA). The WGMCA is closed to commercial fishing for groundfishes managed under the Northeast Multispecies complex and the use of bottom trawling fishing gear is prohibited to protect essential fish habitat. This has reduced fishing pressure and benthic disturbance levels. The area of the SBNMS outside of the WGMCA is still disturbed by intensive commercial fishing for much of the year. Key questions for this area are (1) How does the higher level of disturbance in areas outside of the WGMCA affect SBNMS groundfish communities?, (2) Is the WGMCA effective at increasing the diversity, abundance, and biomass of groundfishes in the SBNMS?, and (3) How does the decrease in disturbance impact groundfish trophic ecology? A comparison of the groundfish communities inside and outside of the WGMCA within the SBNMS was carried out via trawl sampling. Results show that groundfish communities are more diverse inside the WGMCA than outside. Additionally, several commercial groundfish species had higher abundance and/or biomass inside the WGMCA. Stable isotope analyses showed that prey items differed for some species inside and outside of the WGMCA, but trophic levels were unaffected. Finally, stable isotope analyses of five groundfish species provide evidence that groundfishes may display a high level of foraging area fidelity. Primary conclusions include: (1) the protection of groundfish habitats from trawling disturbances paired with reduced fishing pressure will result in increases in community diversity and abundances of groundfishes, (2) groundfish ecology should be considered on a small geographic scale due to apparent site fidelity, and (3) if the entire SBNMS were closed to bottom trawling and commercial fishing, it could help to rebuild overexploited groundfish populations in the southern Gulf of Maine and serve as a source population for the remainder of the Gulf of Maine and adjacent shelf environs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectStellwagen Banken_US
dc.subjectMarine sanctuariesen_US
dc.subjectOceanographyen_US
dc.subjectMarine biologyen_US
dc.titleSmall-scale community structure and trophic ecology of groundfishes in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine sanctuary under two anthropogenic disturbance regimesen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719032086169
dc.identifier.mmsid99196044630001161


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