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dc.contributor.authorDesmond, Cecile Gunnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T12:47:25Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.otherb38906855
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31535
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation theoretically examines and empirically tests relationships between trauma and spirituality. Many clinicians observe a deterioration of religious or spiritual beliefs or worldviews in their clients in the wake of trauma. Empirical studies, however, have produced equivocal results: trauma leads to both spiritual growth and decline. The dissertation surveyed definitions of and approaches to religion, spirituality, and trauma, as well as theories of worldview and world assumptions. It identified variables that include benevolence beliefs about people and the world, transcendent benevolence beliefs, time elapsed since the trauma and the type of trauma experienced. Taking into account religious or spiritual beliefs prior to the trauma, the dissertation asked, how does trauma, operationalized as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, relate to spiritual growth and decline? Participants were recruited from Boston area local trauma clinics and internet support groups. Participants (n=144) completed an online survey about their trauma history, PTSD symptoms, world assumptions, changes in spirituality, and demographics. Path analysis initially reported the theorized model did not adequately represent the relationships found in the data. The model was modified to reflect theoretically sound relationships, and achieved adequate fit. The final model suggested that, at least for individuals who have experienced significant, interpersonal, violent trauma, PTSD is associated with greater decline in spirituality than growth. The large percentage of individuals in this sample (98%) with violent trauma histories made it difficult to draw any conclusions about changes in spirituality in relation to trauma in general. The mediating role of benevolence beliefs with regard to spiritual growth and decline is reported. Type of trauma and time elapsed since the trauma are also discussed. Finally, positive findings related to the importance of religious or spiritual beliefs prior to the trauma are considered. Overall, results suggest that most people who suffer violent trauma tend to experience spiritual decline rather than growth, and it appears benevolence beliefs partially mediate this relationship. This study demonstrates that integrating spiritual issues into the counseling relationship, e.g., a sense of trust in people, the world, or the divine, is an important aspect of trauma recovery therapy. Implications for incorporating spiritual themes are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleSpiritual growth and decline after trauma: the mediating role of benevolence beliefsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719032086367
dc.identifier.mmsid99196021690001161


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