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dc.contributor.authorCapellini, Isabellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Brian T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNunn, Charles L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Robert A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T21:09:07Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T21:09:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-2-25en_US
dc.identifier.citationCapellini, Isabella, Patrick McNamara, Brian T. Preston, Charles L. Nunn, Robert A. Barton. "Does Sleep Play a Role in Memory Consolidation? A Comparative Test" PLoS ONE 4(2): e4609. (2009)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3184
dc.description.abstractSleep is a pervasive characteristic of mammalian species, yet its purpose remains obscure. It is often proposed that 'sleep is for the brain', a view that is supported by experimental studies showing that sleep improves cognitive processes such as memory consolidation. Some comparative studies have also reported that mammalian sleep durations are higher among more encephalized species. However, no study has assessed the relationship between sleep and the brain structures that are implicated in specific cognitive processes across species. The hippocampus, neocortex and amygdala are important for memory consolidation and learning and are also in a highly actived state during sleep. We therefore investigated the evolutionary relationship between mammalian sleep and the size of these brain structures using phylogenetic comparative methods. We found that evolutionary increases in the size of the amygdala are associated with corresponding increases in NREM sleep durations. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NREM sleep is functionally linked with specializations of the amygdala, including perhaps memory processing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Mental Health (1R01MH070415-01A1); Max Planck Societyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.titleDoes Sleep Play a Role in Memory Consolidation? A Comparative Testen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0004609en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19240803en_US
dc.identifier.pmcid2643482en_US


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