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dc.contributor.advisorMayers, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Andrew Nicholasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-31T17:52:16Z
dc.date.available2018-10-31T17:52:16Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31876
dc.description.abstractBetween 1953 and 1963, during the administrations of President Dwight Eisenhower and John Kennedy, the United States government transformed the way it formulated and executed foreign and defense policies. These changes gave the White House its own foreign policy staff, in the form of the National Security Council, and increased the powers of the Secretary of Defense. Most of these changes began under Eisenhower in the 1950s. Eisenhower, however, delayed making several key reforms despite the recommendations of his staff. He believed some reforms were unnecessary and remained ambivalent about others. Moreover, he wanted to avoid sending complex reorganization legislation through Congress, which Eisenhower feared would allow legislators to interfere in matters of the Executive Branch. Democrats in the 1960 presidential election capitalized on the failure to push through these reforms. The Democratic attacks proved remarkably compelling to a bipartisan audience. Kennedy used this bipartisan agreement to enact many of the reforms Eisenhower had ignored. The motivating factor for many of these decisions was not merely an attempt by either President to concentrate power in the White House, it was a belief that the post-1945 world was so unstable that only giving the White House unfettered access and oversight of the levers of power could ensure the safety of the nation. This work merges Diplomatic History with the field of American Political Development to examine these dramatic changes to the structure of the US government. Historians traditionally have examined these Kennedy era administrative changes in isolation. Studying them together with those that took place under Eisenhower yields a more complete picture of how the national security state developed. Despite Eisenhower’s reluctance to adopt some of the reforms embraced by Kennedy, both presidents believed that major reforms were necessary. Any sound analysis of the ways the contemporary United States makes its foreign and defense policies requires understanding momentous changes that took place during the transformational period of the early Cold Waren_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectDepartment of Defenseen_US
dc.subjectDwight D. Eisenhoweren_US
dc.subjectJohn F. Kennedyen_US
dc.subjectNational Security Councilen_US
dc.subjectAmerican historyen_US
dc.subjectUS governmenten_US
dc.titleFighting for national security: building the national security state in the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrationsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-10-09T01:04:56Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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