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dc.contributor.authorHurwitz, Charles Leonarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T15:50:10Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.submitted2006
dc.identifier.otherb27192398
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/31975
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh school honors chemistry students have difficulty applying abstract nanooscopic concepts to predict chemical properties. This dissertation aims at evaluating misconceptions and conceptual change in quantum concepts among honors chemistry students from a suburban high school near Boston. For that purpose a new graphical organizer known as a linkage matrix was developed. The researcher investigated the relative extent to which students shifted to a paradigm of using quantum concepts when explaining macroscopic properties such as solubility or color. The researcher compared the qualitative effects of traditional methods of instruction, i.e. lecture/lab in three classes of seventeen students with the additional effects of discovery via computer simulation on student understanding from two of those classes. Students produced concept maps both prior and subsequent to their study of quantum chemistry. The researcher applied the student-cohort's propositional phrases in a linkage matrix based on eight concepts to analyze student understanding of quantum concepts. Four students from each of the experimental classes were interviewed regarding their c-maps linking phrases to identify patterns and assess the scoring validity. The linkage matrix was used to determine the twelve linking phrases exhibiting a thirty percent improvement in student understanding. All students exhibited a decrease in the number of misconceptions. However, the experimental group showed a greater capacity to link more concepts at a deeper level after the intervention. Previously documented misconception such as overgeneralization, and the particulate nature of matter are exacerbated by the difficulty students have with energy and sign. The research suggests that the activities designed should allow students practice manipulating the variables. The correlational reasoning ability of the students was evaluated using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking as a potential cause of students' difficulty attributing the relationships among concepts.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleEvaluating conceptual change in high school honors chemistry students studying quantum conceptsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-02
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719022884334
dc.identifier.mmsid99178608510001161


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