Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marion Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T15:51:38Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.submitted2006
dc.identifier.otherb26956081
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/32008
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study attempts to understand the nature of the cultural and linguistic experiences that affected a single, monolingual, female teacher during her first overseas experience in an American school in Brazil. A descriptive, qualitative, case study methodology utilized extensive observations, video-taping, and interviews with the teacher, her colleagues, students, and parents to explore how those experiences affected her perceptions and actions towards her colleagues, students, and parents, and how she made sense of these experiences. At the time of this study, there were an estimated 1,000 international schools worldwide, and just over half of these were autonomous institutions sponsored by a variety of interests and corporations. The Escola Americana de Campinas fits into this group. As a worldwide average, the U.S. student population in international schools today is about 30 percent of the total enrolment, and the majority of overseas-hire native English speaking teachers are female, white, middle class and monolingual; many are not adequately prepared for the challenges of teaching children who have different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The study of one such teacher describes the cultural and linguistic discomfort she experienced in her daily life, and with her colleagues and parents. Although she was pedagogically competent, she was not open to changing her teaching practices to more effectively teach students with different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. However, as this teacher learned to speak some Portuguese she became empathetic to some of the linguistic needs of her multi-lingual and multi-cultural students. This case study suggests that this teacher's personal and professional reasons to live and work overseas did not enable her to anticipate and to face the challenges she experienced. She did not have the training or experience to work with a diverse group of students, and the school did not provide adequate support to help her adjustment. This study offers implications and practical suggestions for recruitment agenc1es, administrators, teachers, and pre-service institutions faced with such situations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectAmerican schoolsen_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectMonolingual teachersen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.titleA monolingual female american teacher's first overseas experience in an American school in Brazilen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-02
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719022879037
dc.identifier.mmsid99193506820001161


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record