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dc.contributor.authorLee, Shaneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T15:59:26Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/32027
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractMany animals rely on the ability to perceive and process sounds for communication and survival. The brain must be able to accurately and reliably perceive relevant sounds in the environment and synthesize auditory information to extract meaning. Electrical oscillations have been observed throughout in the brain, and these rhythms have been investigated to understand their relation to auditory function. Experimental evidence suggests that a class of these rhythms in the gamma frequency range (30-90 Hz) is important in behavioral learning and physiological plasticity, which is thought to be a neural correlate for memory. In the primary auditory cortex, dual gamma rhythm generators have been observed in different laminae, but the role of these gamma rhythms in auditory processing is not fully understood. In this work, mathematical models of gamma rhythm generation were used to help understand how gamma rhythms support auditory plasticity and how dual gamma rhythms interact, with implications for interlaminar communication [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleInteractions of gamma frequency rhythms in computational models of primary auditory cortexen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-02
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMathematicsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719032088611
dc.identifier.mmsid99199740840001161


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