Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, Harvey Charles, Jren_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-04T14:41:05Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.date.submitted2002
dc.identifier.otherb24404706
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/32804
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research examined relational closeness between strength coaches and athletes at the Division One level. Closeness in these associations was examined in regard to coach and athlete gender, ethnicity, and age, and athlete self-efficacy in the strength and conditioning domain. Social cognitive and self-efficacy theories (Bandura, 1977,1986, 1997) served as the theoretical underpinnings for the research, though several additional theories informed the study of relationships (Homans,1974; Rusbult,1980a,b; Thibaut & Kelley, 1959; Wright, 1984). Closeness was defined by Kelley's (1983) definition of relational interdependence. This states that closeness between two people may be assessed by the frequency, diversity, strength, and duration of their interactions. Participants were 497 Division One Collegiate Athletes from 19 colleges and universities in the United States. Participants assessed a member of the strength and conditioning staff at their school or college on a version of the Relationship Closeness Inventory (RCI)(Berscheid, Snyder, & Omoto,1989b). This tests the frequency, diversity, and strength of a dyadic relationship as defined by Kelley (1983). Athletes also took the Strength and Conditioning Self-Efficacy Scale (SCSES), which assessed level of ability efficacy in the strength and conditioning domain. While male and female athletes equally described strength and conditioning coaches as either supervisors or friends, male athletes (n = 295) scored significantly higher than female athletes (n = 202) on all modified RCI sub-scales, demonstrating greater behavioral closeness to strength and conditioning coaches. Coach ethnicity, age, and athlete ethnicity were not significant factors, though coach gender did significantly influence athlete self-efficacy. In addition to the frequency and diversity RCI sub-scales, athlete age and duration of the relationship all correlated positively and significantly with the self-efficacy measure. Results suggest that male athletes are more likely to engage in close associations with strength and conditioning coaches than females and that these close relationships both contribute to enhanced athlete self-efficacy and may serve a social support function.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleStrength coach-athlete relationships and self-efficacyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719022840153
dc.identifier.mmsid99181511410001161


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record