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dc.contributor.authorTomiyama, A. Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorGranberg, Ellen M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMajor, Brendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Ericen_US
dc.contributor.authorSutin, Angelina R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrewis, Alexandraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T18:04:40Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T18:04:40Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-15
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000441848000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationA Janet Tomiyama, Deborah Carr, Ellen M Granberg, Brenda Major, Eric Robinson, Angelina R Sutin, Alexandra Brewis. 2018. "How and why weight stigma drives the obesity 'epidemic' and harms health." BMC Medicine, Volume 16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1116-5
dc.identifier.issn1741-7015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/32933
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In an era when obesity prevalence is high throughout much of the world, there is a correspondingly pervasive and strong culture of weight stigma. For example, representative studies show that some forms of weight discrimination are more prevalent even than discrimination based on race or ethnicity. DISCUSSION: In this Opinion article, we review compelling evidence that weight stigma is harmful to health, over and above objective body mass index. Weight stigma is prospectively related to heightened mortality and other chronic diseases and conditions. Most ironically, it actually begets heightened risk of obesity through multiple obesogenic pathways. Weight stigma is particularly prevalent and detrimental in healthcare settings, with documented high levels of ‘anti-fat’ bias in healthcare providers, patients with obesity receiving poorer care and having worse outcomes, and medical students with obesity reporting high levels of alcohol and substance use to cope with internalized weight stigma. In terms of solutions, the most effective and ethical approaches should be aimed at changing the behaviors and attitudes of those who stigmatize, rather than towards the targets of weight stigma. Medical training must address weight bias, training healthcare professionals about how it is perpetuated and on its potentially harmful effects on their patients. CONCLUSION: Weight stigma is likely to drive weight gain and poor health and thus should be eradicated. This effort can begin by training compassionate and knowledgeable healthcare providers who will deliver better care and ultimately lessen the negative effects of weight stigma.
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Medicineen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectMedicine, General & internalen_US
dc.subjectGeneral & internal medicineen_US
dc.subjectWeight stigmaen_US
dc.subjectWeight biasen_US
dc.subjectAnti-fat attitudesen_US
dc.subjectDiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectHealth policyen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectBody-mass indexen_US
dc.subjectMedical studentsen_US
dc.subjectMortalityen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectSocial Stigmaen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.titleHow and why weight stigma drives the obesity 'epidemic' and harms healthen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12916-018-1116-5
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Sociologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8175-5303 (Carr, Deborah)


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© The Author(s) 2018. Open Access.
This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License (
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to
the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver
(
http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.