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dc.contributor.authorKriefall, Nicola G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPechenik, Jan A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPires, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Sarah W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T19:12:38Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T19:12:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-30
dc.identifier.citationNKriefall NG, Pechenik JA, Pires A and Davies SW (2018) Resilience of Atlantic Slippersnail Crepidula fornicata Larvae in the Face of Severe Coastal Acidification. Front. Mar. Sci. 5:312. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00312
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/32934
dc.description.abstractGlobally, average oceanic pH is dropping, and it will continue to decline into the foreseeable future. This ocean acidification (OA) will exacerbate the natural fluctuations in pH that nearshore ecosystems currently experience daily, potentially pushing marine organisms to their physiological limits. Adults of Crepidula fornicata (the Atlantic slippersnail) have proven remarkably resilient to many environmental changes, which is perhaps not surprising considering that they are common intertidally, have a geographically large native range, and have been extremely successful at invading coastal waters in many other parts of the world. However, the larvae of C. fornicata have been shown to be somewhat more vulnerable than adults to the effects of reduced pH. Research to date has focused on the physiological impacts of OA on C. fornicata larvae; few studies have explored shifts in gene expression resulting from changes in pH. In the present study, we examined the response of young (4-day old) C. fornicata larvae to two extreme OA treatments (pH 7.5 and 7.6) relative to pH 8.0, documenting both phenotypic and genome-wide gene expression responses. We found that rearing larvae at reduced pH had subtle influences on gene expression, predominantly involving downregulation of genes related to growth and metabolism, accompanied by significantly reduced shell growth rates only for larvae reared at pH 7.5. Additionally, 10-day old larvae that had been reared at the two lower pH levels were far less likely to metamorphose within 6 h when exposed to inducer. However, all larvae eventually reached similarly high levels of metamorphosis 24 h after settlement induction. Finally, there were no observed impacts of OA on larval mortality. Taken together, our results indicate that far future OA levels have observable, but not severe, impacts on C. fornicata larvae, which is consistent with the resilience of this invasive snail across rapidly changing nearshore ecosystems. We propose that future work should delve further into the physiological and transcriptomic responses of all life history stages to gain a more comprehensive understanding of how OA impacts the littoral gastropod C. fornicata.en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Marine Science
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Kriefall, Pechenik, Pires and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectOceanographyen_US
dc.subjectCrepidula fornicataen_US
dc.subjectOcean acidificationen_US
dc.subjectAtlantic slippersnailen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectGastropoden_US
dc.subjectInvertebratesen_US
dc.subjectCalcium carbonateen_US
dc.subjectAragoniteen_US
dc.subjectGene expressionen_US
dc.titleResilience of Atlantic slippersnail Crepidula fornicata larvae in the face of severe coastal acidificationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draft and published version.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2018.00312
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.date.online2018-08-30


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Copyright © 2018 Kriefall, Pechenik, Pires and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2018 Kriefall, Pechenik, Pires and Davies. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.