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dc.contributor.advisorOffner, Gwynnethen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacneil, Maryannen_US
dc.contributor.authorTatavarthy, Manvitaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-09T19:40:57Z
dc.date.available2019-01-09T19:40:57Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33033
dc.description.abstractNeural crest cells arise during neurulation, a process that occurs during the third week of embryogenesis. These diverse cells then divide into various subtypes including cranial neural crest cells and cardiac neural crest cells. Each of these subtypes gives rise to a wide range of features throughout the fetus. While these cells are extremely diverse, they are also incredibly sensitive to their surrounding environment. Many maternal conditions affect neural crest cell division and migration, but maternal alcohol consumption and hyperglycemia due to gestational diabetes will be discussed in detail, with special attention paid to tissues that derive from cranial neural crest cells. While the initial mechanisms of the pathology vary for both of these conditions, what is remarkable is that they ultimately cause effects in similar ways. Both mechanisms lead to the creation of reactive oxygen species, which in turn trigger apoptotic pathways. Neural crest cell death causes a variety of congenital anomalies in fetuses, including craniofacial defects and cardiac outflow tract defects. Treatment options that have been researched in both conditions also vary, but are based on similar principles. Antioxidant therapies reduce the production of reactive oxygen species, thus reducing the severity of the anomalies affecting the fetus during development. Both maternal alcohol consumption and gestational diabetes are important public health concerns, and their management is of utmost priority in society. By decreasing the rates of women who consume alcohol during pregnancy, and managing gestational diabetes in those at highest risk, the rates of fetal congenital defects could be decreased.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectDevelopmental biologyen_US
dc.subjectCranial neural crest cellen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental biologyen_US
dc.subjectFetal alcohol syndromeen_US
dc.subjectMaternal hyperglycemiaen_US
dc.titleMaternal health-related causes of cranial neural crest cell migration dysregulation, and their common clinical effectsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2018-10-25T19:03:41Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International