Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorErb, M. Kelleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Debbie K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSassaroli, Angeloen_US
dc.contributor.authorFantini, Sergioen_US
dc.contributor.authorBergethon, Peter R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T23:13:27Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T23:13:27Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.date.issued2010-9-16
dc.identifier.citationErb, M. Kelley, Debbie K. Chen, Angelo Sassaroli, Sergio Fantini, Peter R. Bergethon. "Diffuse optical signals in response to peripheral nerve stimulation reflect skeletal muscle kinematics" Biomedical Optics Express 1(3): 943-954. (2010)
dc.identifier.issn2156-7085
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3319
dc.description.abstractPreviously we have reported a near-infrared optical response in the region occupied by a peripheral nerve that is distal to the site of electrical stimulation of that peripheral nerve. This "intermediate" signal is vascular in nature but its biological origin not been elucidated. In the present study, an animal model of the signal has been created and our human studies expanded to directly investigate the contribution of non-artifactual vascular motion induced by muscle contraction to the biological origin of this signal. Under non-invasive conditions during stimulation of the exposed sciatic nerve of the Sprague-Dawley rat, optical responses are robust. These signals can be abolished both pharmacologically and surgically using methods that eliminate muscle motion while leaving the electrophysiological health of the nerve intact. In human studies, signals that are elicited on stimulation of nerves containing motor axons, both within and outside the predicted imaging volume of the spectrometer, have similar temporal characteristics of those previously observed. Moreover, stimulation of sensory nerves alone does not elicit an optical response. These results strongly suggest that the intermediate signals are derived from stimulus-induced muscle contraction (whether via an innervating nerve or by direct stimulation) causing translational vascular motion within the optically interrogated region.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (R01-NS059933); National Institute on Aging (T32-001, T32-AG00277) U.S. Army Medical Acquisition Activity (W81XWH-07-2-0011)en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOptical Society of Americaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2010 Optical Society of America This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License, which permits download and redistribution, provided that the original work is properly cited. This license restricts the article from being modified or used commercially.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectMedical optics and biotechnologyen_US
dc.subjectMedical optics instrumentationen_US
dc.subjectSpectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectTissue diagnosticsen_US
dc.titleDiffuse Optical Signals in Response to Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Reflect Skeletal Muscle Kinematicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1364/BOE.1.000943
dc.identifier.pmcid3018059


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright 2010 Optical Society of America This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License, which permits download and redistribution, provided that the original work is properly cited. This license restricts the article from being modified or used commercially.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2010 Optical Society of America This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License, which permits download and redistribution, provided that the original work is properly cited. This license restricts the article from being modified or used commercially.