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dc.contributor.authorQian, Jiehuien_US
dc.contributor.authorYazdanbakhsh, Arashen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-21T16:01:53Z
dc.date.available2019-02-21T16:01:53Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000358153000027&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationJiehui Qian, Arash Yazdanbakhsh. 2015. "A Neural Model of Distance-Dependent Percept of Object Size Constancy." PLOS ONE, Volume 10, Issue 7, pp. ? - ? (19). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129377
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33393
dc.description.abstractSize constancy is one of the well-known visual phenomena that demonstrates perceptual stability to account for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. Although theories involving distance scaling to achieve size constancy have flourished based on psychophysical studies, its underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Single cell recordings show that distance-dependent size tuned cells are common along the ventral stream, originating from V1, V2, and V4 leading to IT. In addition, recent research employing fMRI demonstrates that an object’s perceived size, associated with its perceived egocentric distance, modulates its retinotopic representation in V1. These results suggest that V1 contributes to size constancy, and its activity is possibly regulated by feedback of distance information from other brain areas. Here, we propose a neural model based on these findings. First, we construct an egocentric distance map in LIP by integrating horizontal disparity and vergence through gain-modulated MT neurons. Second, LIP neurons send modulatory feedback of distance information to size tuned cells in V1, resulting in a spread of V1 cortical activity. This process provides V1 with distance-dependent size representations. The model supports that size constancy is preserved by scaling retinal image size to compensate for changes in perceived distance, and suggests a possible neural circuit capable of implementing this process.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been supported in part by the Center of Excellence for Learning in Education, Science and Technology (CELEST, NSF SBE-0354378), Office of Naval Research (ONR N00014-11-1-0535), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR, FA9550-12-1-0436), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (14wkpy20). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. (SBE-0354378 - Center of Excellence for Learning in Education, Science and Technology (CELEST, NSF); N00014-11-1-0535 - Office of Naval Research (ONR); FA9550-12-1-0436 - Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR); 14wkpy20 - Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities)en_US
dc.format.extent19 p.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary sciencesen_US
dc.subjectVergence eye-movementsen_US
dc.subjectMonkey visual-cortexen_US
dc.subjectVertical disparitiesen_US
dc.subjectStereoscopic depthen_US
dc.subjectInvariance hypothesisen_US
dc.subjectCortical connectionsen_US
dc.subjectComputational modelen_US
dc.subjectEgocentric distanceen_US
dc.subjectViewing distanceen_US
dc.subjectMacaque monkeysen_US
dc.subjectDistance perceptionen_US
dc.subjectModels, theoreticalen_US
dc.subjectSize perceptionen_US
dc.subjectGeneral science & technologyen_US
dc.titleA neural model of distance-dependent percept of object size constancyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0129377
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International