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dc.contributor.authorKontoff, David M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T04:12:17Z
dc.date.issued1964
dc.date.submitted1964
dc.identifier.otherb14618114
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33496
dc.descriptionThesis (M.M.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractStatement of the problem. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the present practices of selected junior high school band programs in Massachusetts' cities between 5,000 and 25,000 population; (2) to identify corresponding practices advocated in the literature of music education; and (3) to evaluate findings by comparing with the recommendations of the music education profession. Sources of data. The sources of data used in this investigation include: (1) publications in music education, (2) unpublished theses and dissertations in music education, and (3) a questionnaire. Conclusions. The following conclusions were formulated from the findings of the inquiry: 1. Tests and consultations with homeroom teachers were helpful, but not necessary as a prerequisite in the selection of band members. 2. Demonstrations were a desirable means of stimulating student interest in music. 3. The three-month trial plan appeared to be the most popular rental plan offered to beginning pupils. 4. Parents were notified of the student's progress by special reports from the music department. Telephone conversations were a popular means of communication with parents. 5. The seventh grade level appeared to be best for the beginning of study on an instrument. 6. Students were usually allowed to select the instrument of their choice, although band directors made suggestions for balanced instrumentation. 7. Instruction books were not provided by the school. 8. Expensive and unusual instruments were provided by the school to selected youngsters, such as: oboes, alto and bass clarinets, tenor and baritone saxophones, bassoons, French horns, baritones, basses, and percussion equipment. 9. Uniforms were rarely found in the junior high schools. 10. Liost communi ties had a seven period day, with the average length of the period from forty-five to forty-eight minutes. 11. Most junior high school bands marched in parades and performed concerts in their own schools. Few school bands traveled to other communities. 12. The rotating schedule was seldom employed. 13. Private lessons after school hours was used often and highly recommended by the music supervisors. 14. Class lessons were seldom offered during the school day. 15. Dance bands most often rehearsed after school hours.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectSchool band programsen_US
dc.subjectMassachusettsen_US
dc.subjectJunior high schoolen_US
dc.subjectMusic educationen_US
dc.titleA survey of selected junior high school instrumental programs in Massachusettsen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Musicen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMusic Educationen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025508724
dc.identifier.mmsid99187813420001161


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