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dc.contributor.authorNorton, D. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, V. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, M. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, G. O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSomers, David C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-28T19:12:46Z
dc.date.available2019-02-28T19:12:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationDJ Norton, VA Nguyen, MF Lewis, GO Reynolds, DC Somers, A Cronin-Golomb. 2016. "Visuospatial Attention to Single and Multiple Objects Is Independently Impaired in Parkinson's Disease." PloS one, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp. e0150013 - e0150013.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33656
dc.description.abstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with deficits in visuospatial attention. It is as yet unknown whether these attentional deficits begin at a perceptual level or instead reflect disruptions in oculomotor or higher-order processes. In the present study, non-demented individuals with PD and matched normal control adults (NC) participated in two tasks requiring sustained visuospatial attention, both based on a multiple object tracking paradigm. Eye tracking was used to ensure central fixation. In Experiment 1 (26 PD, 21 NC), a pair of identical red dots (one target, one distractor) rotated randomly for three seconds at varied speeds. The task was to maintain the identity of the sole target, which was labeled prior to each trial. PD were less accurate than NC overall (p = .049). When considering only trials where fixation was maintained, however, there was no significant group difference, suggesting that the deficit’s origin is closely related to oculomotor processing. To determine whether PD had additional impairment in multifocal attention, in Experiment 2 (25 PD, 15 NC), two targets were presented along with distractors at a moderate speed, along with a control condition in which dots remained stationary. PD were less accurate than NC for moving (p = 0.02) but not stationary targets. This group difference remained significant when considering only trials where fixation was maintained, suggesting the source of the PD deficit was independent from oculomotor processing. Taken together, the results implicate separate mechanisms for single vs. multiple object tracking deficits in PD.en_US
dc.format.extentp. e0150013 - e0150013en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPloS one
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLeft hemi-Parkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectSuperior-colliculusen_US
dc.subjectParietal cortexen_US
dc.subjectTrackingen_US
dc.subjectNeglecten_US
dc.subjectResourcesen_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAttentionen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectMotion perceptionen_US
dc.subjectParkinson diseaseen_US
dc.subjectMD multidisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectGeneral science & technologyen_US
dc.titleVisuospatial attention to single and multiple objects Is independently impaired in Parkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4169-5895 (Somers, DC)
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International