Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWest, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorHofman, Courtney A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEbbert, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorShirazi, Sabrinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDunning, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaldonado, Jesus E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-01T16:28:56Z
dc.date.available2019-03-01T16:28:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000409319400019&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationCatherine West, Courtney A Hofman, Steve Ebbert, John Martin, Sabrina Shirazi, Samantha Dunning, Jesus E Maldonado. 2017. "Integrating archaeology and ancient DNA analysis to address invasive species colonization in the Gulf of Alaska." CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp. 1163 - 1172 (10). https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12865
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892
dc.identifier.issn1523-1739
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/33692
dc.description.abstractThe intentional and unintentional movement of plants and animals by humans has transformed ecosystems and landscapes globally. Assessing when and how a species was introduced are central to managing these transformed landscapes, particularly in island environments. In the Gulf of Alaska, there is considerable interest in the history of mammal introductions and rehabilitating Gulf of Alaska island environments by eradicating mammals classified as invasive species. The Arctic ground squirrel (Urocitellus parryii) is of concern because it affects vegetation and seabirds on Gulf of Alaska islands. This animal is assumed to have been introduced by historic settlers; however, ground squirrel remains in the prehistoric archaeological record of Chirikof Island, Alaska, challenge this timeline and suggest they colonized the islands long ago. We used 3 lines of evidence to address this problem: direct radiocarbon dating of archaeological squirrel remains; evidence of prehistoric human use of squirrels; and ancient DNA analysis of dated squirrel remains. Chirikof squirrels dated to at least 2000 years ago, and cut marks on squirrel bones suggested prehistoric use by people. Ancient squirrels also shared a mitochondrial haplotype with modern Chirikof squirrels. These results suggest that squirrels have been on Chirikof longer than previously assumed and that the current population of squirrels is closely related to the ancient population. Thus, it appears ground squirrels are not a recent, human‐mediated introduction and may have colonized the island via a natural dispersal event or an ancient human translocation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank T. Rick, D. Grayson, R. Fleischer, M. Hawkins, A. West, and C. Mikeska for their contributions to this research. We also thank 3 reviewers and the editors of Conservation Biology who greatly improved this paper. This work was funded by the National Geographic Society, the University of Maine, the Smithsonian Institution, and Boston University. The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (National Geographic Society; University of Maine; Smithsonian Institution; Boston University)en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1163 - 1172en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCONSERVATION BIOLOGY
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversity conservationen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversity & conservationen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciences & ecologyen_US
dc.subjectAncient translocationen_US
dc.subjectGround squirrelen_US
dc.subjectInvasive species managementen_US
dc.subjectUrocitellus parryiien_US
dc.subjectZooarchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectSquirrels spermophilus-parryiien_US
dc.subjectChirikof islanden_US
dc.subjectBoneen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectNorthwesten_US
dc.subjectCollagenen_US
dc.subjectMammalsen_US
dc.subjectArdilla terrestreen_US
dc.subjectManejo de especies invasorasen_US
dc.subjectTranslocación antiguaen_US
dc.subjectzooarqueologíaen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectConservation of natural resourcesen_US
dc.subjectDNA, ancienten_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectIntroduced speciesen_US
dc.subjectSciuridaeen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural and veterinary sciencesen_US
dc.titleIntegrating archaeology and ancient DNA analysis to address invasive species colonization in the Gulf of Alaskaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.12865
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International