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Factors Associated with Herb and Dietary Supplement Use by Young Adults in the United States

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dc.contributor.author Gardiner, Paula en_US
dc.contributor.author Kemper, Kathi J en_US
dc.contributor.author Legedza, Anna en_US
dc.contributor.author Phillips, Russell S en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-12T16:48:44Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-12T16:48:44Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007-11-30 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Gardiner, Paula, Kathi J Kemper, Anna Legedza, Russell S Phillips. "Factors Associated with herb and dietary supplement use by young adults in the United States" BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 7:39. (2007) en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6882 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2144/3374
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND. Little is known about the association between use of herbs and dietary supplements (HDS) and lifestyle/behavior factors in young adults in the US. METHODS. Analyzing the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), we examined the patterns of HDS (excluding vitamins/minerals) use among young adults in the United States using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. RESULTS. In our sample of 18 to 30 year olds (n = 6666), 26% were current smokers, 24% were moderate/heavy drinkers, 43% had high physical activity, and 54% and 76% use prescription and over the counter (OTC) medications respectively. Non-vitamin, non-mineral HDS was used by 17% of the overall sample in the last 12 months. In the multivariable analysis, the lifestyle and behavioral factors associated with HDS use include: current smoking (odds ratio 1.41 95% CI [1.16–1.72]); being a former smoker (1.50 [1.15–1.95]); moderate/heavy alcohol use (2.02 [1.53–2.65]); high physical activity levels (2.45 [1.98–3.03]); and prescription medication use (1.51 [1.26–1.81]). Among HDS users, only 24% discussed their use with a health care professional. CONCLUSION. Nearly one in five young adults report using non-vitamin/non-mineral HDS. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship National Institutes of Health (Institutional National Research Service Award T32-AT0051, National Library of Medicine R01 LM007709); National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (K24-AT000589); Fullerton Foundation of Gaffney, South Carolina en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2007 Gardiner et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_US
dc.title Factors Associated with Herb and Dietary Supplement Use by Young Adults in the United States en_US
dc.type article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1472-6882-7-39 en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid 18053129 en_US
dc.identifier.pmcid 2213683 en_US


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Copyright 2007 Gardiner et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2007 Gardiner et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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