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dc.contributor.authorAzzi-Lessing, Lenetteen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-19T15:38:28Z
dc.date.available2019-03-19T15:38:28Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000323891900002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationLenette Azzi-Lessing. 2013. "Serving Highly Vulnerable Families in Home-Visitation Programs." INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp. 376 - 390 (15). https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21399
dc.identifier.issn0163-9641
dc.identifier.issn1097-0355
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34308
dc.description.abstractHome-visitation programs for families with young children are growing in popularity in the US. These programs typically seek to prevent child abuse and neglect and/or promote optimal development for infants, toddlers, and/or preschool-age children. This paper focuses on improving the capacity of home-visitation programs to meet the complex needs of highly vulnerable families with young children. Poverty, maternal depression and substance abuse, and domestic violence are noted as factors that place young children at risk for poor outcomes. The challenges of providing home-visitation services to families in which these risk factors are present are discussed. Family engagement, matching services to families’ needs, and staff capabilities are highlighted as areas in which improvements can be made to enhance home-visitation programs’ capacity to serve highly vulnerable families. Recommendations are given for improving the effectiveness of home-visitation programs in serving these families, as well for addressing policy and research issues related to the further development and evaluation of these programs.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 376 - 390en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofINFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, developmentalen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectEarly Head Starten_US
dc.subjectInfant mental healthen_US
dc.subjectEarly childhood settingsen_US
dc.subjectMaternal depressionen_US
dc.subjectVisiting programsen_US
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectSupport programsen_US
dc.subjectSubstance abuseen_US
dc.subjectAttachment securityen_US
dc.subjectParent involvementen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive scienceen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental & child psychologyen_US
dc.subjectHome visitingen_US
dc.subjectHighly vulnerable familiesen_US
dc.subjectFamily engagementen_US
dc.subjectEarly childhood programsen_US
dc.subjectFamily supporten_US
dc.titleServing highly vulnerable families in home-visitation programsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draften_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/imhj.21399
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Social Worken_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International