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dc.contributor.authorAzzi-Lessing, Lenetteen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-19T17:41:38Z
dc.date.available2019-03-19T17:41:38Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000294876700001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationLenette Azzi-Lessing. 2011. "Home visitation programs: Critical Issues and Future Directions." EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH QUARTERLY, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp. 387 - 398 (12). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2011.03.005
dc.identifier.issn0885-2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34309
dc.description.abstractAs support for intervening early in the lives of vulnerable children has risen in the United States in recent years, so has interest in home-visitation programs. Home visitation is increasingly recognized for its potential to foster early child development and competent parenting, as well as to reduce risk for child abuse and neglect and other poor outcomes for vulnerable families. This paper provides a discussion of several aspects of home-visitation programs that warrant further development and evaluation, including the powerful role of context in determining program outcomes, as well as the impact of other factors, including service dosage, levels of family engagement, and characteristics of home visitors. The importance of more accurately understanding and measuring risk and engaging family members beyond the mother–child dyad is also discussed. Recommendations are made for making improvements in all of these areas, in order to strengthen home-visitation programs and produce better outcomes for the children and families they serve. Aspects of Nurse Family Partnership and Early Head Start, two widely replicated and rigorously evaluated programs, are highlighted to demonstrate how the issues discussed here are likely to affect service delivery and program outcomes. The multiple challenges inherent in replicating and evaluating home-visitation programs that are truly responsive to the needs of a wide array of families with young children are examined. This discussion concludes with a call to expand and improve methods for evaluating these programs, and to view home visitation as a component of a comprehensive system of child and family supports, rather than as a stand-alone model of intervention.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 387 - 398en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE INCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH QUARTERLY
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectEducation & educational researchen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, developmentalen_US
dc.subjectHome visitationen_US
dc.subjectFamily supporten_US
dc.subjectEarly Head Starten_US
dc.subjectNurse family partnershipen_US
dc.subjectProgram evaluationen_US
dc.subjectHome visitingen_US
dc.subjectEffective prevention programsen_US
dc.subjectLow-birth weighten_US
dc.subjectMaternal depressionen_US
dc.subjectChild abuseen_US
dc.subjectVisiting programsen_US
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectAfrican-Americanen_US
dc.subjectRandomized trialen_US
dc.subjectSubstance abuseen_US
dc.subjectEducation systemsen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental & child psychologyen_US
dc.titleHome visitation programs: critical issues and future directionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draften_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecresq.2011.03.005
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Social Worken_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US


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